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Working my way through Ruby concepts right now. Coming from a VB background, there are some concepts I don't quite grasp yet. Yield is one of them. I understand how it works in a practical sense, but fail to see the significance of Yield, or when and how I would use it to its full potential.

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3 Answers 3

Yield is part of a larger system of closures in Ruby. It is a very powerful part of the language and you will find it in every Ruby script you encounter.

http://www.robertsosinski.com/2008/12/21/understanding-ruby-blocks-procs-and-lambdas/

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Saving this for tomorrow morning, after my first caffeine shot! Thanks. –  user973718 Sep 30 '11 at 22:23

It's good to have an understanding of how yield works but I seldom use it and thought that the same was true for others. The comments to this answer could indicate otherwise.

Ruby's yield statement hands over the control to a block given to the method. After the block has finished the control is returned to the method and it keeps on executing the statement directly after the yield.

Here's a variant of the overused Fibonacci sequence

def fib(upto) 
  curr,  succ = 1, 1 
  while curr <= upto
      puts "before"
      yield curr
      puts "after"
      curr, succ = succ, curr+succ 
  end 
end

You then call the method with something like

fib(8) {|res| puts res}

and the output will be

before
1
after
before
1
after
before
2
after
before
3
after
before
5
after
before
8
after
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2  
"in practice you will almost never use it" - That strongly depends on what you do. We have quite a few places in our production app where we make use of yield. –  Michael Kohl Sep 30 '11 at 20:33
    
I use yield often. –  Derek Sep 30 '11 at 20:42
    
I use code that uses yield quite often but I seldom write any yields myself. Guess I was way too subjective there. –  Jonas Elfström Sep 30 '11 at 21:27
    
@JonasElfström Some examples: dependency injection. DSLs. The yield self pattern for something like the block configuration form in gemspecs. –  Michael Kohl Sep 30 '11 at 21:37
    
@MichaelKohl You are clearly a very advanced Ruby programmer. As for DI I'm with Jamis Buck on that one stackoverflow.com/questions/283466/… weblog.jamisbuck.org/2008/11/9/legos-play-doh-and-programming and I also guess that's it's quite uncommon among Ruby programmers to write gems or even DSLs. I'm not picking a fight here. –  Jonas Elfström Sep 30 '11 at 22:02

Good reading: http://blog.codahale.com/2005/11/24/a-ruby-howto-writing-a-method-that-uses-code-blocks/

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Thanks for the link: good reading for a beginner like me! –  user973718 Sep 30 '11 at 22:20

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