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I want to to convert an Object to a type that will be assigned at runtime.

For example, assume that I have a function that assigns a string value(from a TextBox or Dropdownlist) to an Object.Property.

How would I convert the value to proper type? For instance, it could be an integer, string, or enum.

Public void Foo(object obj,string propertyName,object value)
{
  //Getting type of the property og object.
  Type t= obj.GetType().GetProperty(propName).PropertyType;

  //Now Setting the property to the value .
  //But it raise an error,because sometimes type is int and value is "2"
  //or type is enum (e.a: Gender.Male) and value is "Male"
  //Suppose that always the cast is valid("2" can be converted to int 2)

  obj.GetType().GetProperty(propName).SetValue(obj, value, null);
}
share|improve this question
    
can you give a example where this would be used? If you don't know the concrete type why would you need to cast it? Have you thought going dynamic? – Carsten Sep 30 '11 at 21:17
    
Do you know what the type is when you pass the argument into the Foo method? – James Johnson Sep 30 '11 at 21:21
    
@JamesJohnson I think you can always find out if you need :-) – username Sep 30 '11 at 21:25
up vote 20 down vote accepted

You need to use the Convert.ChangeType(...) function (the input could just as easily be an object ... I just had a string version pre-baked):

/// <summary>
        /// Sets a value in an object, used to hide all the logic that goes into
        ///     handling this sort of thing, so that is works elegantly in a single line.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="target"></param>
        /// <param name="propertyName"></param>
        /// <param name="propertyValue"></param>
        public static void SetValueFromString(this object target, string propertyName, string propertyValue)
        {
            PropertyInfo oProp = target.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
            Type tProp = oProp.PropertyType;

            //Nullable properties have to be treated differently, since we 
            //  use their underlying property to set the value in the object
            if (tProp.IsGenericType
                && tProp.GetGenericTypeDefinition().Equals(typeof(Nullable<>)))
            {
                //if it's null, just set the value from the reserved word null, and return
                if (propertyValue == null)
                {
                    oProp.SetValue(target, null, null);
                    return;
                }

                //Get the underlying type property instead of the nullable generic
                tProp = new NullableConverter(oProp.PropertyType).UnderlyingType;
            }

            //use the converter to get the correct value
            oProp.SetValue(target, Convert.ChangeType(propertyValue, tProp), null);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
The only downside to this approach is that it won't work on nullable types. – James Johnson Sep 30 '11 at 21:46
    
Just noticed that you do have some logic in there for nullable types. – James Johnson Sep 30 '11 at 22:02
    
Convert.ChangeType() is satisfying although I should do some checking for enums , tnx fordareh. – nAviD Sep 30 '11 at 22:10

A universal Type Converter is what you seek !? Not an easy feat..

Try this approach:

Universal Type Converter

Also, is using Generics out of the question here? It would facilitate the solution if you know at least the target type of the conversion.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure it works, but give it a try:

public static T To<T>(this IConvertible obj)
{
  return (T)Convert.ChangeType(obj, typeof(T));
}

Public void Foo(object obj,string propertyName,object value)
{
    Type t= obj.GetType().GetProperty(propName).PropertyType;
    obj.GetType().GetProperty(propName).SetValue(obj, value.To<t>(), null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work, because generic type t in To<t>() must be defined in compile time . – nAviD Sep 30 '11 at 22:08
    
@Navid: no, because of the extension method I put at the beginning of my answer. I'm quite sure it will be evaluated at runtime... – Marco Sep 30 '11 at 22:10
    
I can say for a fact that this does not work and that @Navid is correct. Generic methods need the type to be provided at compile time – workabyte Aug 7 '15 at 14:13

Here's another way you can do it, but I'm not sure

Without support for generic types:

public void Foo(object obj,string propertyName,object value) 
{ 
    //Getting type of the property og object. 
    Type type = obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).PropertyType;

    obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).SetValue(obj, Activator.CreateInstance(type, value), null);
} 

With support for generic types:

public void Foo(object obj,string propertyName,object value) 
{ 
    //Getting type of the property og object. 
    Type type = obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).PropertyType;

    if (type.IsGenericType)
        type = type.GetGenericArguments()[0];

    obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName).SetValue(obj, Activator.CreateInstance(type, value), null);
} 
share|improve this answer

I used the Convert function in C#. The way I'm doing my conversion is using reflection.:

Type type = this.myObject.GetType();

if (type.Name == "MyObjectClass") {
var Voucherrequest = (MyObjectClass)Convert.ChangeType(myObject, typeof(MyObjectClass));

This is all assuming you know what type you want to convert into. You can even make a switch and have multiple types you want to reflect too.

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