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If I never want an integer to go over 100, is there any simple way to make sure that the integer never exceeds 100, regardless of how much the user adds to it?

For example,

50 + 40 = 90
50 + 50 = 100
50 + 60 = 100
50 + 90 = 100

Thanks in advance

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nothing more simple than a simple if –  Mansuro Sep 30 '11 at 22:00
4  
write a class ? –  Karoly Horvath Sep 30 '11 at 22:01
1  
You can use a ternary expression to enforce the value: n = n > 100 ? 100 : n; –  Brandon Moretz Sep 30 '11 at 22:02
1  
There is already one - INT_MAX :-)) –  user405725 Sep 30 '11 at 22:04
3  
This is called saturated addition, if you need to google it. Keep in mind that (50+60)-30 != 50+(60-30). Do you really want to clip the result at every step, or only at the end? What is the end then? –  MSalters Sep 30 '11 at 22:41
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6 Answers

Try this:

std::min(50 + 40, 100);
std::min(50 + 50, 100);
std::min(50 + 60, 100);
std::min(50 + 90, 100);

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/min/

Another option would be to use this after each operation:

if (answer > 100) answer = 100;
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1  
Alternatively if you don't want to use the STL, you can define your own min function, such as template <class T> const T& min ( const T& a, const T& b ) { return !(b<a)?a:b; } –  jli Sep 30 '11 at 22:08
5  
Why would you not want to use the standard library? –  John Dibling Sep 30 '11 at 22:23
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Here is a fairly simple and fairly complete example of a simple ADT for a generic BoundedInt.

  • It uses boost/operators to avoid writing tedious (const, non-assigning) overloads.
  • The implicit conversions make it interoperable.
  • I shunned the smart optimizations (the code therefore stayed easier to adapt to e.g. a modulo version, or a version that has a lower bound as well)
  • I also shunned the direct templated overloads to convert/operate on mixed instantiations (e.g. compare a BoundedInt to a BoundedInt) for the same reason: you can probably rely on the compiler optimizing it to the same effect anyway

Notes:

  • you need c++0x support to allow the default value for Max to take effect (constexpr support); Not needed as long as you specify Max manually

A very simple demonstration follows.

#include <limits>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/operators.hpp>

template <
    typename Int=unsigned int, 
    Int Max=std::numeric_limits<Int>::max()>
struct BoundedInt : boost::operators<BoundedInt<Int, Max> >
{
    BoundedInt(const Int& value) : _value(value) {}

    Int get() const { return std::min(Max, _value); }
    operator Int() const { return get(); }

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const BoundedInt& bi)
    { return std::cout << bi.get() << " [hidden: " << bi._value << "]"; }

    bool operator<(const BoundedInt& x) const   { return get()<x.get(); }
    bool operator==(const BoundedInt& x) const  { return get()==x.get(); }
    BoundedInt& operator+=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() + x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator-=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() - x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator*=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() * x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator/=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() / x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator%=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() % x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator|=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() | x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator&=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() & x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator^=(const BoundedInt& x) { _value = get() ^ x.get(); return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator++() { _value = get()+1; return *this; }
    BoundedInt& operator--() { _value = get()-1; return *this; }
  private:
    Int _value;
};

Sample usage:

typedef BoundedInt<unsigned int, 100> max100;

int main()
{
    max100 i = 1;

    std::cout << (i *= 10) << std::endl;
    std::cout << (i *= 6 ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << (i *= 2 ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << (i -= 40) << std::endl;
    std::cout << (i += 1 ) << std::endl;
}

Demo output:

10 [hidden: 10]
60 [hidden: 60]
100 [hidden: 120]
60 [hidden: 60]
61 [hidden: 61]

Bonus material:

With a fully c++11 compliant compiler, you could even define a Userdefined Literal conversion:

typedef BoundedInt<unsigned int, 100> max100;

static max100 operator ""_b(unsigned int i) 
{ 
     return max100(unsigned int i); 
}

So that you could write

max100 x = 123_b;        // 100
int    y = 2_b*60 - 30;  //  70
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+1 for a much more complete demo than mine. –  Bill Sep 30 '11 at 22:36
    
While complete, there's really no need to overload every operator unless you really need tight control over the intermediate operations. My class is much simpler and does the same thing. –  Mark Ransom Sep 30 '11 at 22:49
    
@MarkRansom: I find it hard to tell what exactly is needed. I hate introducing leaky abstractions as well - the Principle Of Least Surprise should hold, even for silly sample code, IMO. I intended to show a generic bounded integer class, as you can easily see from the way it is declared as a template as well. Consider this a mould. I'll be able to refer to this post in the future –  sehe Sep 30 '11 at 22:52
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You can write your own class IntegerRange that includes overloaded operator+, operator-, etc. For an example of operator overloading, see the complex class here.

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The simplest way would be to make a class that holds the value, rather than using an integer variable.

class LimitedInt
{
    int value;
public:
    LimitedInt() : value(0) {}
    LimitedInt(int i) : value(i) { if (value > 100) value = 100; }
    operator int() const { return value; }
    LimitedInt & operator=(int i) { value = i; if (value > 100) value = 100; return *this; }
};

You might get into trouble with results not matching expectations. What should the result of this be, 70 or 90?

LimitedInt q = 2*60 - 30;
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Yes.

As a bare minimum, you could start with this:

template <int T>
class BoundedInt
{
public:
  explicit BoundedInt(int startValue = 0) : m_value(startValue) {}
  operator int() { return m_value; }

  BoundedInt operator+(int rhs)
    { return BoundedInt(std::min((int)BoundedInt(m_value + rhs), T)); }

private:
  int m_value;
};
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C++ does not allow overriding (re-defining) operators on primitive types.

If making a custom integer class (as suggested above) does not fall under your definition of a "simple way", then the answer to your question is no, there is no simple way to do what you want.

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