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Going a bit mental here trying to work out what this does in python:

print "word" in [] == False

Why does this print False?

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closed as not a real question by Mark, Daniel Pryden, Steven Rumbalski, Andrew Barber, Graviton Oct 1 '11 at 2:14

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Do you have a question? –  Johnsyweb Sep 30 '11 at 22:30
1  
If you are expecting output of True, you need to group the "word" in [] in parens: print ("word" in []) == False –  GreenMatt Sep 30 '11 at 22:34
2  
comparing with booleans is pointless. –  Jochen Ritzel Sep 30 '11 at 22:57
    
possible duplicate of python operator precedence of in and comparision –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 1 '11 at 1:04
    
This would be more on topic at codegolf.stackexchange.com –  agf Oct 2 '11 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Perhaps a more clear example of this unusual behaviour is the following:

>>> print 'word' in ['word']
True
>>> print 'word' in ['word'] == True
False

Your example is equivalent to:

print ("word" in []) and ([] == False)

This is because two boolean expressions can be combined, with the intention of allowing this abbreviation:

a < x < b

for this longer but equivalent expression:

(a < x) and (x < b)
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1  
Like 3 < a == 4 or 3 < a in [4,5]? wow. –  Karoly Horvath Sep 30 '11 at 22:34
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I don't get it, why is that? –  F.C. Sep 30 '11 at 22:34
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is there any way to see how Python evaluates this internally? something like sql explain –  F.C. Sep 30 '11 at 22:48
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@F.C.: You can do import dis; dis.dis(lambda: 'word' in [] == False) but it's quite tricky to read it. –  Mark Byers Sep 30 '11 at 22:54
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-1: "unexpected behaviour". It's far from unexpected. It's unusual because the construct is unusual. But it's far from unexpected. The expression rules are quite clear on this. Aren't they? docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html –  S.Lott Sep 30 '11 at 23:58

Just like you can chain operators in 23 < x < 42, you can do that with in and ==.

"word" in [] is False and [] == False evaluates to False. Therefore, the whole result is

"word" in [] == False
"word" in [] and [] == False
False and False
False
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Just to add to Mark Byers great answer

>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis(lambda: 'word' in [] == False)
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               1 ('word')
              3 BUILD_LIST               0
              6 DUP_TOP             
              7 ROT_THREE           
              8 COMPARE_OP               6 (in)
             11 JUMP_IF_FALSE_OR_POP    21
             14 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (False)
             17 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
             20 RETURN_VALUE        
        >>   21 ROT_TWO             
             22 POP_TOP             
             23 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis(lambda: ('word' in []) == False)
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               1 ('word')
              3 LOAD_CONST               2 (())
              6 COMPARE_OP               6 (in)
              9 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (False)
             12 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
             15 RETURN_VALUE        
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