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I have a .py source with many class definitions, like so:

class C:
    # code c

class A:
    # code a

class B:
    # code b

I want to turn it into:

class A:
    # code a

class B:
    # code b

class C:
    # code c

Is there a tool for this? What about doing it with emacs?

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1  
Is it intentional that the name of the class changed from Z to C? –  Mark Byers Sep 30 '11 at 23:03
    
You'd like to alphabetize your classes? –  Thomas Sep 30 '11 at 23:14
3  
Sorting module members by lexical name is almost never a useful/sensible approach. Sort them by logical relatedness (with base classes naturally before subclasses by necessity). Your goal is to produce readable/maintainable code, not OCD-style application of arbitrary rules. Finding the definition for a class is easy with a simple find operation, there is no need to alphabetise to make members easy to locate. –  bobince Sep 30 '11 at 23:26
1  
@bobince: Please post your answer as an answer so we can upvote it properly. –  S.Lott Sep 30 '11 at 23:50
    
Well, it's not really an answer, just a screed. :-) Maybe there's some good reason for doing it. Probably not, but maybe. –  bobince Oct 1 '11 at 7:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I coded it for you, but only because I was interested in seeing how sort-subr works. I do not condone the intent of the original question. :)

Also, if you upvote this answer, plase also upvote @db48x's didactic answer.

Use python-sort-defs the same way you would use sort-paragraph.

(defun python-sort-defs (reverse beg end)
  (interactive "P\nr")
  (save-excursion
    (save-restriction
      (narrow-to-region beg end)
      (goto-char (point-min))
      (sort-subr reverse
                 (function
                  (lambda ()
                    (while (and (not (eobp)) (looking-at paragraph-separate))
                      (forward-line 1))))
                 'python-end-of-block-must-move))))

(defun python-end-of-block-must-move ()
  (when (eq (point) (progn
                      (python-end-of-block)
                      (point)))
    (forward-line 1)))
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I agree with bobince that alphabetical order isn't a useful way to sort functions or other bits of code, but you might give sort-paragraphs a go. It might even work.

If it doesn't, then I can see by looking at the implementation of sort-paragraphs that it does this:

  (sort-subr reverse
     (function
      (lambda ()
        (while (and (not (eobp)) (looking-at paragraph-separate))
          (forward-line 1))))
     'forward-paragraph))))

I bet you could come up with some functions to plug in there that would make it work. The first one moves point to the start of the next record and the second one moves the point to the end of the current record. There are some optional arguments for functions that tell it where the sort key is within the record which might also come in handy.

These functions are in sort.el; you can use C-h f sort-paragraphs and C-h f sort-subr to pull up the documentation for them; this will include a link to the source.

Have fun :)

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