Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the following HTML and CSS, I see absolutely nothing in my browser (Chrome and IE latest at time of writing). Everything collapses down to 0x0 px. Why?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <style type="text/css">
        section { display: table; height: 100%; background-color: grey; }

        #colLeft { display: table-column; height: 100%; background-color: green; }
        #colRight { display: table-column; height: 100%; background-color: red; }

        #row1 { display: table-row; height: 100%; }
        #row2 { display: table-row; height: 100%; }
        #row3 { display: table-row; height: 100%; }

        #cell1 { display: table-cell; height: 100%; }
        #cell2 { display: table-cell; height: 100%; }
        #cell3 { display: table-cell; height: 100%; }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <section>
        <div id="colLeft">
            <div id="row1">
                <div id="cell1">
                    AAA
                </div>
            </div>
            <div id="row2">
                <div id="cell2">
                    BBB
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
        <div id="colRight">
            <div id="row3">
                <div id="cell3">
                    CCC
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </section>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The CSS table model is based on the HTML table model http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/tables.html

A table is divided into ROWS, and each row contains one or more cells. Cells are children of ROWS, they are NEVER children of columns.

"display: table-column" does NOT provide a mechanism for making columnar layouts (e.g. newspaper pages with multiple columns, where content can flow from one column to the next).

Rather, "table-column" ONLY sets attributes that apply to corresponding cells within the rows of a table. E.g. "The background color of the first cell in each row is green" can be described.

The table itself is always structured the same way it is in HTML.

In HTML (observe that "td"s are inside "tr"s, NOT inside "col"s):

<table ..>
  <col .. />
  <col .. />
  <tr ..>
    <td ..></td>
    <td ..></td>
  </tr>
  <tr ..>
    <td ..></td>
    <td ..></td>
  </tr>
</table>

Corresponding HTML using CSS table properties (Note that the "column" divs do not contain any contents -- the standard does not allow for contents directly in columns):

<div class="mytable">
  <div class="column1"></div>
  <div class="column2"></div>
  <div class="myrow">
    <div class="mycell">contents of first cell in row 1</div>
    <div class="mycell">contents of second cell in row 1</div>
  </div>
  <div class="myrow">
    <div class="mycell">contents of first cell in row 2</div>
    <div class="mycell">contents of second cell in row 2</div>
  </div>
</div>

the CSS:

.mytable {
  display: table;
  ...
}
.myrow {
  display: table-row;
  ...
}
.mycell {
  display: table-cell;
  ...
}
.column1 {
  display: table-column;
  background-color: green;
}
.column2 {
  display: table-column;
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to work in IE7 though... :( –  Sam7 Jun 5 '13 at 7:46
    
I haven't tried this myself, but I have seen recommendations for tanalin.com/en/projects/display-table-htc which is a javascript solution for IE6 and IE7. When the javascript runs, it converts the page into the older HTML table tags. –  ToolmakerSteve Jun 17 '13 at 2:32
    
Solution works on IE8+, Firefox, Chrome, iPad, Android. It is a good way to avoid table layouts if you need flexible structure of a table and you are supporting more modern browsers listed above. –  mbokil Jul 26 '13 at 17:58

The "table-column" display type means it acts like the <col> tag in HTML - i.e. an invisible element whose width* governs the width of the corresponding physical column of the enclosing table.

See the W3C standard for more information about the CSS table model.

* And a few other properties like borders, backgrounds.

share|improve this answer
    
If the col element has a logical structure, which it does, then how does one justify using the CSS rule display: table-column;, which only has presentational structure? According to the specs on display (w3.org/wiki/CSS/Properties/display), it's supposed to "behave" like a col element. But I can't see how that's useful... –  chharvey Jan 8 '12 at 8:48
1  
@TestSubject528491 Because then you can set the column background, column width, etc, of a [presentational] table. But really it's mostly useful in terms of specifying the default style rule for the <col> tag itself, or an equivalent tag in a different XML-based markup language. –  Random832 Jan 8 '12 at 16:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.