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I have a simple program that doesn't behave the way I expected it to behave. I was under the impression that both Method Signatures would run in the order of the Invocation List of the Delegate during the CallEvent() method and make the Test Property equate to 40. Hence:

Test += (20+15);
Test += (20-15);
Test == 40;

As it would turn out, this assignment is equal to 5, which is the value of the subtraction. If it did the addition first then replaced it with subtraction, doesn't that defeat the purpose of the Test += assignment? Maybe it is bypassing the addition all together (however unlikely). I suspect something more inherent is going on that I just can't see with my current programming knowledge.

Please and Thank You! LiquidWotter

//MY NAMESPACE
namespace MyNamespace
{
    //MAIN
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //CREATE MY OBJECT
        MyClass MyObject = new MyClass();

        //ADD CALLS TO EVENT
        MyObject.MyEvent += Add;
        MyObject.MyEvent += Sub;

        //CALL EVENT AND WRITE
        MyObject.CallEvent(20, 15);
        Console.WriteLine(MyObject.Test.ToString());

        //PAUSE
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    //ADDITION
    private static int Add(int x, int y)
    { return x + y; }

    //SUBTRACTION
    private static int Sub(int x, int y)
    { return x - y; }

    //MY CLASS
    public class MyClass
    {
        //MEMBERS
        public delegate int MyDelegate(int x, int y);
        public event MyDelegate MyEvent;
        public int Test { get; set; }

        //CONSTRUCTOR
        public MyClass()
        {
            this.Test = 0;
        }

        //CALL Event
        public void CallEvent(int x, int y)
        {
            Test += MyEvent(x, y);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You're not really using events the way they are meant to be used. If you want to store a delegate, store it then in a variable. That's not what the role of an event is. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 1 '11 at 2:16
    
You stumbled on the reason (guideline) that all events should be void f(...) –  Henk Holterman Oct 1 '11 at 8:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well you are correct. There can only be one return value[1], while both delegates where called only one, in fact the last, returned its value. Which makes sense, because how should the framework know what to do in cases where you directly place your event in a method as an argument:

  this.Foo( MyEvent(x, y) );

call Foo once or multiple times? somehow combine the values? You see it is not clear.

I have to add that the order of delegates is also not defined[2], well currently it is defined(The order of registration) but you should never rely on it.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was looking for, thanks for the references as well. :) –  Liquid Wotter Oct 1 '11 at 2:32

Using the += operator adds a new delegate to the invokation chain. A chain is how it is evaluated. Each delegate will be invoked in order in the chain. But, because the delegates are all invoked (meaning they block and return a value to the caller) only the last result is returned in your assignment.

Assuming this example is a simplification, rather than having delegates with a result you could use a collection of lambda epxressions and Linq extensions to Sum or simply maintain state in your class.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public class Program
{
    //MAIN 
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IEnumerable<Func<int, int, int>> operationsList = 
            new Func<int,int, int>[] { Add, Sub };

        //CALL EVENTs AND WRITE 
        Console.WriteLine(operationsList.Sum(operation => operation(20, 15)));

        //PAUSE 
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    //ADDITION 
    private static int Add(int x, int y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }

    //SUBTRACTION 
    private static int Sub(int x, int y)
    {
        return x - y;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great way to actually solve the problem of the program! However, my question was about the nature of the delegates and events. I was baffled why they didn't work the way I had expected. :) –  Liquid Wotter Oct 1 '11 at 3:04
    
+1 For giving an alternative, that's something missing in my post. –  dowhilefor Oct 1 '11 at 11:45

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