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I've been trying to compare two lists in Haskell and found an answer here
I wonder how
all (flip elem listx) input
works especially for the role flip plays here.
When I take out flip it won't work anymore.

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5  
Note: I suspect this would be idiomatically written: all (`elem` listx) input. If you know about backticks and operator sections this should make sense. –  luqui Oct 1 '11 at 8:54
    
But why elem is an infix here? –  manuzhang Oct 1 '11 at 11:21
    
Any function with at least 2 arguments can be used in infix form. And because e ´elem´ list just reads better than elem e list many prefer it this way. –  Ingo Oct 1 '11 at 11:31
    
but the two arguments are listx and input? so isn't it a prefix notation here? –  manuzhang Oct 1 '11 at 13:50
    
input isn't an argument to elem, quite. Read left to right. all takes two arguments, a function and a list, and returns true if the function is true for everything in the list. The arguments to elem are listx and one element at a time from input. –  Zopa Oct 1 '11 at 16:03

1 Answer 1

  1. flip elem listx is equivalent to (flip elem) listx.
  2. (flip elem) is the same as elem, but with the arguments in opposite order. This is what flip does.
  3. elem is a function that takes an element and a list, and checks whether the element belongs to the list.
  4. So flip elem is a function that that takes a list and an element, and checks whether the element belongs to the list.
  5. Therefore flip elem listx is a function that that takes an element, and checks whether the element belongs to listx.
  6. Now all takes a predicate and a list, and checks whether all elements of the list satisfy the predicate.
  7. all (flip elem listx) take a list, and checks whether all elements of the list satisfy flip elem listx. That is, whether they all belong to listx.
  8. all (flip elem listx) input checks whether all elements of input belong to listx.
  9. Q.E.D.
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Very nice explanation. Almost artistic. :-) –  luqui Oct 1 '11 at 22:21
    
@n.m. I found the type of flip on Hoogleflip :: (a->b->c)->b->a->cwhich makes me to believe it is a elem listx supposing a is an element of input. It makes sense now why flip is needed here and I have to use backtick without it –  manuzhang Oct 14 '11 at 1:48

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