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I'm upgrading to Rails 3.1 and have a problem with testing a module that we include in several ActiveRecord models. We previously used a test model, like this:

describe FundTransfer do

  class TestFundTransfer < ActiveRecord::Base
    include FundTransfer

    # stub db columns
    class << self
      def columns() FundReturn.columns; end
    end
  end

  subject { TestFundTransfer.new }

  it { should belong_to(:admin) }
  it { should belong_to(:bank_account) }

  it "is not valid without bank account and moneybookers account" do
    fund_transfer = TestFundTransfer.new
    fund_transfer.should_not be_valid
  end

(complete spec: https://gist.github.com/1255960)

This breaks, because it doesn't find the table. I could probably find a way to stub the columns (like we did before) but my question is: does anyone have experience in doing this in a better way? In this form we cannot test anything that involves saving/loading the model.

I'm thinking about the following options:

  • create a table with polluting the main schema
  • create a table in the test, before the transaction is started
  • stub columns (doesn't allow save/find)

Does anyone has any experience with this or have a better idea?

Note: The mixin specifies belongs_to associations, so I cannot use ActiveModel modules for my test model, it needs to be an ActiveRecord model.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry I can't answer your question directly but why are you testing belongs_to anyway? That and presumably also your validations are rails' concern, not yours. Test your own code, not rails. –  noodl Oct 1 '11 at 12:09
    
Perhaps I'm missing the point but assert_belongs_to and co. always seem asinine to me. –  noodl Oct 1 '11 at 12:10
1  
Firstly, I don't think testing belongs_to is pointless. For example you could override the bank_account method to accept some options, but your test will make sure it still behaves well with the normal parameters. Also, it's good to make sure somebody doesn't accidentally remove those rails calls. Secondly, I have more tests, that are more "original" :) The complete file is here: gist.github.com/1255960 –  Leventix Oct 1 '11 at 12:21
    
Those are fair points. I would still discourage automatically testing calls to rails methods with testing macros. In most cases you're just adding duplication without value. –  noodl Oct 1 '11 at 12:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a nice question, something I have struggled with myself as well. I tend to go for a different solution. While it is intended that your module is included in a class that inherits from ActiveRecord::Base, this is not explicit requirement. So I tend to manufacture a class that can include the class.

So something like this:

  class TestFundTransfer
    cattr_accessor :belongs_to_relations

    def self.belongs_to(relation)
      @@belongs_to_relations ||= []
      @@belongs_to_relations << relation
    end 

    include FundTransfer
  end

  context "on included" do
    it "adds the correct belongs_to relations" do
      TestFundTransfer.belongs_to_relations.should == [:your_relations]
    end
  end

Granted this could become complex, but on the other hand it is very explicit, and the dependencies are clear. Secondly there is no need to do fake magic to get the ActiveRecord::Base working.

Inside remarkable_activerecord I did see a different approach: they use helper methods to create dummy tables and classes (and delete the table after use). In their case they need to test actual active-record behaviour, so the extra miles really make sense. Not sure if I would use the same approach in a rails project.

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Does it help to declare the class as abstract?

class TestFundTransfer < ActiveRecord::Base
  include FundTransfer
  def self.abstract_class?; true; end
end
share|improve this answer
    
No, it still looks for the table. –  Leventix Oct 1 '11 at 15:08

I managed to get the test passing:

# stub db columns
class << self
  def columns() FundReturn.columns; end
  def columns_hash() FundReturn.columns_hash; end
  def column_defaults() FundReturn.column_defaults; end
end

But I'd like to hear if anyone has a nicer solution.

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