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I have such a html code:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner"></div>
</div>

How can I make #inner div to have width 100% of #outer but minus 10px?

Here is my css:

#outer {
    width: 100%;
    max-width: 500px;
}
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Please note that my answer is not technically correct; the padding on the #outer will instead grow the #outer element 10px total, and the #inner will be 500px in my first example. This is because padding is additive to element width. See: jsfiddle.net/ZtaCM/2 On further reflection, @thirtydot's answer is correct, but only if the inner element's width is set to auto (and it's not set to a finite value or to inherit). My answer might still work for you, but I wanted to point out the problem. –  Jared Farrish Oct 1 '11 at 13:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

NOTE

See ThirtyDot's answer, as it does not impact the outer element's width:

How to make div width almost 100%

The below will actually make the outer element's width total the width plus the padding left and right values, which is not what the question is asking. Sorry for the confusion. :)


You could add a padding left and right of 5px (assuming you want the #inner to be 10px less total, not per side):

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner"></div>
</div>

#outer {
  width: 500px;
  height: 500px;
  background: red;
  padding: 2px 5px;
}
#inner {
  width: 100%;
  height: 500px;
  background: blue;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/ZtaCM/

EDIT

Taking into account the max-width property, see this demo:

<div id="test">
    <div id="outer">
        <div id="inner"></div>
    </div>
</div>
<p>
    <input type="button" onclick="changeWidth('400px')" value="Change to 400px"/>
    <input type="button" onclick="changeWidth('500px')" value="Change to 500px"/>
    <input type="button" onclick="changeWidth('600px')" value="Change to 600px"/>
</p>

#outer {
  width: 100%;
  max-width: 500px;
  background: red;
  padding: 2px 5px;
}
#inner {
  width: 100%;
  height: 200px;
  background: blue;
}
#test {
  background: yellow;
  width: 600px;
}

function changeWidth(width) {
    document.getElementById('test').style.width = width;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/ZtaCM/1/

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1  
In this case the full width of #outer div is equal to 510px. –  Karolis Oct 1 '11 at 12:53
    
Eh, you're right. Hmm... –  Jared Farrish Oct 1 '11 at 13:01
    
The reason I ended up switching to padding (and forgetting that padding is additive in the meantime) is because if the #inner has a 100% width, the margin only shows on the left. So I'm wondering how to get around that if the #inner has a set width (maybe, 99% or some other number). –  Jared Farrish Oct 1 '11 at 13:06

Simply set a margin-left and/or a margin-right of 10px:

#inner {
    margin: 0 10px
}

For example: http://jsfiddle.net/xrmAE/1/

Change 10px to 5px if required.

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I'm wondering about something. The above works, but only if the #inner inherits the width of the #outer. When I had worked on my fiddle initially, I set the #inner width to 100%, noticed that the margin only showed on the left, and switched it to padding on the #outer, which is actually wrong, since it adds 10px to the #inner width, not subtracts it. Is it only possible to do this then when the inner element inherits the width of the outer? –  Jared Farrish Oct 1 '11 at 13:12
    
@JaredFarrish #inner div does not inherit the width from #outer div. Inner div uses a default value of width: auto. –  Karolis Oct 1 '11 at 13:19
    
@Karolis - Bah. I'm having a rough morning. –  Jared Farrish Oct 1 '11 at 13:25
    
It's not that it's inheriting the width (confusing terminology because inherit means something else), it's that the width of #inner is set to auto. But yes, it's only possible to do this when the inner element has width set to auto. If you check the spec (let's forget about padding/border): 'margin-left' + 'width' + 'margin-right' = width of containing block. –  thirtydot Oct 1 '11 at 13:27
    
@JaredFarrish: I got sidetracked in the middle of writing the above comment, so I didn't see the issue had already been explained. Oh well. –  thirtydot Oct 1 '11 at 13:29

What about padding: 10px for #outer?

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