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Let's say we have this code:

class C(CC):
  a = 1
  b = 2
  def __init__(self):
    self.x = None
    self.y = 1

How can I quickly find out in Python where is the attribute or method defined? If it belongs to ancestor class or if it's the method of class C. You can see attributes a, b, x, y . Must they belong to class C? or can they be from ancestor classes? When does the type is assigned to the variable?

Why not rather use

class C(CC):
  a = 1
  b = 2
  x = None
  y = 1

thank you

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1  

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the first example, a and b are attributes of the C class object. (Think "static" attributes.) And x and y are attributes of C instances. (So, regular instance attributes.)

In the second example, all four are attributes of C, not of its instances.

In Python, you can't "declare" attributes as defined by a specific class, which means there are no attribute definitions to inherit to begin with. (More or less, but I'm not going to muddle the waters by introducing __slots__). You can find method definitions by searching for "def method_name(", and method definitions are inherited as in most OO languages.

Confusingly, you can access class attributes through instances of a class, then if you assign a new value to that attribute, a new instance attribute is created:

In [1]: class C(object): a=1
In [2]: c1 = C()

In [3]: c1.a
Out[3]: 1

In [5]: c1.__dict__
Out[5]: {}

In [6]: c1.a=2

In [7]: c1.__dict__
Out[7]: {'a': 2}

In [8]: c2 = C()

In [9]: c2.a
Out[9]: 1

Which does let you give instance attribute default values by using class attributes. I don't believe this is a very common thing to do though – I favour using default values to __init__() arguments.

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You can then get even more interesting: C.a = 3; then c1.a == 2 because it's its own instance variable and c2.a == 3 because it's looked it up in the prototype chain back to the class. –  Chris Morgan Oct 1 '11 at 14:33
    
Later in other functions are calls of self.x.someMethod() so x is probably some object but where is defined what x actual is? In some inherited class? Or it can be whatever? –  xralf Oct 1 '11 at 14:33
    
You say "confusingly", but I've never found it such (even when I was first coming to Python). It's purely a prototype chain. As soon as you set a value in the instance, it's set in the instance, and that's that. –  Chris Morgan Oct 1 '11 at 14:36
1  
@xralf: x could be defined anywhere. And I mean anywhere. c4 = C(); c4.x = Q(). It's generally going to be more likely to be defined inside the class or a superclass, but it's by no means required. –  Chris Morgan Oct 1 '11 at 14:38
    
I find it confusing for several reasons. One is that Python has a class-based object model, so you don't expect a prototype chain for data. Another is that the behaviour is different from C++ static and its descendants. Yet another is that I expect an object's "data" to be in its __dict__ / __slots__. (Expect and/or want, for instance for automatic prettyprinting of the data.) So it can (theorethically) throw off even to Python users that don't rely on the behaviour. I get how the behaviour makes sense and is necessary in the context of Python's metamodel, but I don't like it for data. –  millimoose Oct 1 '11 at 15:21

Why not rather use

class C(CC):
  a = 1
  b = 2
  x = None
  y = 1

This is not the same thing. This has four class-level attributes which are shared by all objects of class C.

This, is different. It has two class-level attributes shared by all objects of class C and two instance variables which are unique to each object of class C.

class C(CC):
  a = 1
  b = 2
  def __init__(self):
    self.x = None
    self.y = 1

Your two code samples are very different. They cannot be compared.

To answer your other question, we use GREP and other tools to search the source. It's easy.

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2  
ack: betterthangrep.com - its URL says all you need to know, if you haven't heard of it. –  Chris Morgan Oct 1 '11 at 14:33
    
grep or ack or ctags or GLOBAL or $EDITOR_OF_CHOICE... –  millimoose Oct 1 '11 at 15:27

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