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Why do these 2 RegEx benchmarks differ so much? They use the same RegEx, one in-place and one stored via qr//

Results:

                          Rate rege1.FIND_AT_END    rege2.FIND_AT_END
rege1.FIND_AT_END     661157/s                   --                 -85%
rege2.FIND_AT_END    4384042/s                 563%                   --
                          Rate rege1.NOFIND         rege2.NOFIND
rege1.NOFIND          678702/s                   --                 -87%
rege2.NOFIND         5117707/s                 654%                   --
                          Rate rege1.FIND_AT_START  rege2.FIND_AT_START
rege1.FIND_AT_START   657765/s                   --                 -85%
rege2.FIND_AT_START  4268032/s                 549%                   --

# Benchmark
use Benchmark qw(:all);

my $count = 10000000;
my $re = qr/abc/o;
my %tests = (
    "NOFIND        " => "cvxcvidgds.sdfpkisd[s"
   ,"FIND_AT_END   " => "cvxcvidgds.sdfpabcd[s"
   ,"FIND_AT_START " => "abccvidgds.sdfpkisd[s"
);

foreach my $type (keys %tests) {
    my $str = $tests{$type};
    cmpthese($count, {
        "rege1.$type" => sub { my $idx = ($str =~ $re); },
        "rege2.$type" => sub { my $idx = ($str =~ /abc/o); }
    });
}

share|improve this question
    
I was surprised at the order of magnitude difference. I ran this on my machine and found rege2 to be 37%, 42% and 33% faster on the three test. Still faster but not as dramatic. Active State 5.8.8 on Windows XP, Intel Core2 2.4GHz, 4gb RAM –  Bill Ruppert Oct 1 '11 at 16:45
    
How can the pre-compiled regex be slower than the in-place one? –  TLP Oct 1 '11 at 16:58
    
See also: perlmonks.org/?node_id=846761 –  martin clayton Oct 1 '11 at 17:00
    
Could it have something to do with the fact that subroutines are defined at compile time? –  TLP Oct 1 '11 at 17:21
    
BTW: the /o is superfluous if you do not interpolate variables. The in-place regex will be compiled only once as well. My hunch is that the pre-compiled version is stringified and recompiled, which seems odd. Can you try doing $str =~ /$re/o (the /o matters in THIS case) instead? –  tsee Oct 1 '11 at 19:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are dealing with operations that are intrinsically very fast, so you need to run a few more tests to narrow down on where the speed is going. I have also switched the benchmark model from an external (letting cmpthese do it) to internal (for loop) speed magnification. This minimizes the overhead of the subroutine call and any work that cmpthese has to do. Finally, testing to see if the difference scales with magnitude is important (in this case it doesn't).

use Benchmark 'cmpthese';

my $re = qr/abc/o;
my %tests = (
   'fail ' => 'cvxcvidgds.sdfpkisd[s',
   'end  ' => 'cvxcvidgds.sdfpabcd[s',
   'start' => 'abccvidgds.sdfpkisd[s',
);

for my $mag (map 10**$_, 1 .. 5) {
    say "\n$mag:";
    for my $type (keys %tests) {
        my $str = $tests{$type};
        cmpthese -1, {
            '$re    '.$type => sub {my $i; $i = ($str =~ $re   ) for 0 .. $mag},
            '/abc/o '.$type => sub {my $i; $i = ($str =~ /abc/o) for 0 .. $mag},
            '/$re/  '.$type => sub {my $i; $i = ($str =~ /$re/ ) for 0 .. $mag},
            '/$re/o '.$type => sub {my $i; $i = ($str =~ /$re/o) for 0 .. $mag},
        }
    }
}
10:
                 Rate $re    fail  /$re/  fail  /$re/o fail  /abc/o fail 
$re    fail  106390/s           --          -8%         -72%         -74%
/$re/  fail  115814/s           9%           --         -70%         -71%
/$re/o fail  384635/s         262%         232%           --          -5%
/abc/o fail  403944/s         280%         249%           5%           --
                 Rate $re    end   /$re/  end   /$re/o end   /abc/o end  
$re    end   105527/s           --          -5%         -71%         -72%
/$re/  end   110902/s           5%           --         -69%         -71%
/$re/o end   362544/s         244%         227%           --          -5%
/abc/o end   382242/s         262%         245%           5%           --
                 Rate $re    start /$re/  start /$re/o start /abc/o start
$re    start 111002/s           --          -3%         -72%         -73%
/$re/  start 114094/s           3%           --         -71%         -73%
/$re/o start 390693/s         252%         242%           --          -6%
/abc/o start 417123/s         276%         266%           7%           --

100:
                Rate /$re/  fail  $re    fail  /$re/o fail  /abc/o fail 
/$re/  fail  12329/s           --          -4%         -77%         -79%
$re    fail  12789/s           4%           --         -76%         -78%
/$re/o fail  53194/s         331%         316%           --          -9%
/abc/o fail  58377/s         373%         356%          10%           --
                Rate $re    end   /$re/  end   /$re/o end   /abc/o end  
$re    end   12440/s           --          -1%         -75%         -77%
/$re/  end   12623/s           1%           --         -75%         -77%
/$re/o end   50127/s         303%         297%           --          -7%
/abc/o end   53941/s         334%         327%           8%           --
                Rate $re    start /$re/  start /$re/o start /abc/o start
$re    start 12810/s           --          -3%         -76%         -78%
/$re/  start 13190/s           3%           --         -75%         -77%
/$re/o start 52512/s         310%         298%           --          -8%
/abc/o start 57045/s         345%         332%           9%           --

1000:
               Rate $re    fail  /$re/  fail  /$re/o fail  /abc/o fail 
$re    fail  1248/s           --          -8%         -76%         -80%
/$re/  fail  1354/s           9%           --         -74%         -79%
/$re/o fail  5284/s         323%         290%           --         -16%
/abc/o fail  6311/s         406%         366%          19%           --
               Rate $re    end   /$re/  end   /$re/o end   /abc/o end  
$re    end   1316/s           --          -1%         -74%         -77%
/$re/  end   1330/s           1%           --         -74%         -77%
/$re/o end   5119/s         289%         285%           --         -11%
/abc/o end   5757/s         338%         333%          12%           --
               Rate /$re/  start $re    start /$re/o start /abc/o start
/$re/  start 1283/s           --          -1%         -75%         -81%
$re    start 1302/s           1%           --         -75%         -80%
/$re/o start 5119/s         299%         293%           --         -22%
/abc/o start 6595/s         414%         406%          29%           --

10000:
              Rate /$re/  fail  $re    fail  /$re/o fail  /abc/o fail 
/$re/  fail  130/s           --          -6%         -76%         -80%
$re    fail  139/s           7%           --         -74%         -79%
/$re/o fail  543/s         317%         291%           --         -17%
/abc/o fail  651/s         400%         368%          20%           --
              Rate /$re/  end   $re    end   /$re/o end   /abc/o end  
/$re/  end   128/s           --          -3%         -76%         -79%
$re    end   132/s           3%           --         -76%         -78%
/$re/o end   541/s         322%         311%           --         -10%
/abc/o end   598/s         366%         354%          11%           --
              Rate /$re/  start $re    start /$re/o start /abc/o start
/$re/  start 132/s           --          -1%         -77%         -80%
$re    start 133/s           1%           --         -76%         -79%
/$re/o start 566/s         330%         325%           --         -13%
/abc/o start 650/s         394%         388%          15%           --

100000:
               Rate /$re/  fail  $re    fail  /$re/o fail  /abc/o fail 
/$re/  fail  13.2/s           --          -8%         -76%         -78%
$re    fail  14.2/s           8%           --         -74%         -76%
/$re/o fail  55.9/s         325%         292%           --          -8%
/abc/o fail  60.5/s         360%         324%           8%           --
               Rate /$re/  end   $re    end   /$re/o end   /abc/o end  
/$re/  end   12.8/s           --          -3%         -75%         -79%
$re    end   13.2/s           3%           --         -75%         -78%
/$re/o end   52.3/s         308%         297%           --         -12%
/abc/o end   59.7/s         365%         353%          14%           --
               Rate $re    start /$re/  start /$re/o start /abc/o start
$re    start 13.4/s           --          -2%         -77%         -78%
/$re/  start 13.6/s           2%           --         -77%         -78%
/$re/o start 58.2/s         334%         328%           --          -6%
/abc/o start 62.2/s         364%         357%           7%           --

You can easily see that the tests are falling into two categories, the ones with /.../o in the source, and the ones without. Since this is a syntatic difference, it gives you clues that it is probably a case that the compiler is optimizing (or that the runtime is allowed to cache in some way). (removing checks of the variables after they have been done once, simplifying the stack, it is hard to say without looking at the source).

The results are probably also dependent on the version of perl being used. The above tests are run on v5.10.1

share|improve this answer

First, the /o does noting because you don't interpolate into that pattern.

Now on to the question.

1/661157 s - 1/4384042 s = 0.000,001,3 s
1/678702 s - 1/5117707 s = 0.000,001,3 s
1/657765 s - 1/4268032 s = 0.000,001,3 s

So =~ $re takes an extra 1.3 microsecond (or 0.68 on my machine). There are three extra Perl ops in the =~ $re case, and that accounts for some of it. I'm not sure why three, though. One is to fetch $re, but I don't know what the other two do.

>perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e"$x =~ /abc/"
1  <0> enter
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <#> gvsv[*x] s
4  </> match(/"abc"/) vKS/RTIME
5  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK

>perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e"$x =~ $re"
1  <0> enter
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <#> gvsv[*x] s
4  <1> regcreset sK/1
5  <#> gvsv[*re] s
6  <|> regcomp(other->7) sK/1
7  </> match() vKS/RTIME
8  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK

1.3 microsecs seems a bit excessive, but it's not really a significant amount.

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