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According to the documentation,

Called when activity start-up is complete (after onStart() and onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle) have been called). Applications will generally not implement this method; it is intended for system classes to do final initialization after application code has run.

Derived classes must call through to the super class's implementation of this method. If they do not, an exception will be thrown.

is is not advised to use this method. However, I use it to tweak some elements after onCreate. I see that some people use it to do something between onResume() and they are advised not to do this as they cannot rely on this method (due to its bad documentation).

So, can I use the tweaking here (it does not rely on onResume at all)?
Do you ever use this method and when/why?

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Am I really the only one that uses this method??? – sandalone Oct 2 '11 at 12:16
up vote 6 down vote accepted

As the documentation states, onPostCreate is mostly intended for framework use. The question is: What do you intend to do in onPostCreate() that you can't do in onCreate() or onResume() (i.e. what exactly does "tweaking some elements" mean)?

I am not using it, as I see no reason to do so - all I need to do can be done in onCreate or onResume. However Google itself uses it in it's TabActivity for instance.

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you're right. why using it when I can use onStart or onResume. Thanks – sandalone May 8 '12 at 7:16
    
Glad I could help :) – AgentKnopf May 8 '12 at 17:47

onPostCreate can be useful if you are making your own "super-class" extension of Activity with functionality that all your activities shall share.

using onPostCreate as a callback method from subclass' onCreate will notify that all creation is finnished. Example: If you have activities sharing the same layout, then you can use the onPostCreate to add onClickListeners etc

If you are overriding onPostCreate, it is best to make the call to super.onPostCreate at the end of your implementation.

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This is how I use it in combination with butterknife to inject all my views, it's very useful. – bclymer Nov 18 '13 at 20:47
    
What about calling super.onCreate() in overridden onCreate methods and then attaching listeners? From developer.android.com/reference/android/app/…: Applications will generally not implement this method; it is intended for system classes to do final initialization after application code has run. – Lars Blumberg Dec 19 '13 at 14:16

Google uses onPostCreate() in their example project for Navigation Drawer. ActionBarDrawerToggle needs to sync after orientation change lets say :)

@Override
protected void onPostCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onPostCreate(savedInstanceState);

    // Sync the toggle state after onRestoreInstanceState has occurred.
    mDrawerToggle.syncState();
}

So I think onPostCreate() should be used only in some specific situations...

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This is an extension to the second answer:

Imagine you are trying to implement BaseActivity which doesn't set any layout in OnCreate method.

public abstract class BaseActivity extends AppCompatActivity {
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);    
    }
}

Then imagine you have some other Activity (extends the BaseActivity) which sets some layout :

public class MainActivity extends BaseActivity { 
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
    }
}

activity_main.xml:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent">

<Button
    android:id="@+id/myBtn"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"/>
</LinearLayout>

So the the very first time when you can use your button in BaseActivity is onPostCreate method:

public abstract class BaseActivity extends AppCompatActivity {
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);    
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPostCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onPostCreate(savedInstanceState);
        Button btn = (Button) findViewById(R.id.myBtn); //this is the when you can initialise your button

    }

}

Using BaseActivity is a common practice in making good apps!

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I use onPostCreate() when i need to change the view programmatically. Because call findViewById() not work when i use in onCreate.

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I briefly wanted to comment on this: Since you're encouraged to use Fragments to lay out your UI you could simply use the Fragment's onViewCreated Method to update your post-creation. Alternatively you could even do it onCreateView - where the view is actually created/inflated. – AgentKnopf Aug 21 '15 at 6:36

There might be situations you will be needing to use it. specially with the newer APIs.

A scenario that it might be useful is during rotation change, or return state to an activity that has a progress bar inside the action bar. you will need to set it false inside it onPostCreate()

@Override
protected void onPostCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
        super.onPostCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setProgressBarIndeterminateVisibility(false);
}
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Since none of the answers made a point on onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle), I want to make a point here. This method will be called, If an app is forcefully removed from the memory and then started by the user again. So that we can use this method to retain activity state, Incase if the user previously removed the app forcefully from memory.

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According to the event name 'Post' meaning, i always use it for checking Elements size might be changed during onCreated, especially while Elements or layouts should be changed after screen rotated.

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