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I would like to define a C++ template specialization that applies to all subclasses of a given base class. Is this possible?

In particular, I'd like to do this for STL's hash<>. hash<> is defined as an empty parametrized template, and a family of specializations for specific types:

template<class _Key>
  struct hash { };

template<>
  struct hash<char>
  {
    size_t
    operator()(char __x) const
    { return __x; }
  };

template<>
  struct hash<int>
  {
    size_t
    operator()(int __x) const
    { return __x; }
  };
...

I would like to define something like this:

template<class Base>
  struct hash {
    size_t operator()(const Base& b) const {
      return b.my_hash();
    }
  };

class Sub : public Base {
  public:
    size_t my_hash() const { ... }
};

and be able to use it like this:

hash_multiset<Sub> set_of_sub;
set_of_sub.insert(sub);

However, my hash template conflicts with the generic one from STL. Is there a way (perhaps using traits) to define a template specialization that applies to all subclasses of a given base class (without modifying the STL definitions)?

Note that I know I can do this with some extra template parameters whenever this hash specialization is needed, but I'd like to avoid this if possible:

template<>
  struct hash<Base> {
    size_t operator()(const Base& b) const {
      return b.my_hash();
    }
  };

....

// similar specialization of equal_to is needed here... I'm glossing over that...
hash_multiset<Sub, hash<Base>, equal_to<Base> > set_of_sub;
set_of_sub.insert(sub);
share|improve this question
    
if its conflicting why not use a namespace ? –  Arunmu Oct 1 '11 at 18:09
1  
A possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1032973/… –  n.m. Oct 1 '11 at 18:11
    
... where the solution is to name all the derived classes in a similar way, which is not quite satisfactory. –  jpalecek Oct 2 '11 at 10:48

2 Answers 2

The solution is to use SFINAE to decide whether or not to allow your specialisation depending on the class inheritance structure. In Boost you can use enable_if and is_base_of to implement this.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid you can't use enable_if in this particular case. –  jpalecek Oct 2 '11 at 10:45
    
jpalecek: Why not? BTW, if boost is the answer here, it might not help me anyway, since my workplace restricts the libraries we can use, and boost::enable_if is not part of the prescribed subset. –  Warren Harris Oct 2 '11 at 14:22
    
Then you may have to roll your own, but you should be able to get something that works as you want by using SFINAE. –  KayEss Oct 4 '11 at 13:42

This was the best I could do:

template<>
  struct hash<Sub> : hash<Base> {
  };

I'm a little worried that I didn't have to make operator() virtual, though.

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