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I am new to CSS and facing an issue related to contextual selectors as following:

Q1) What is the effect of creating selectors in the following way:

.test1 .test2{
    background:red;
}

Here test1 and test2 are the class selectors.

I understand that when we use such structure with 'type' selectors then that leads to styling of descendants.

Is this the same thing for the class selectors?

Q2) If yes, then will all the contextual rules (+, >) etc.. for the 'type' selector will also apply for class selectors?

Q3) And will all these rules also be then applicable to the 'id' selectors?

I have seen the use of such structure in the css files of js libraries like ExtJS

.x-border-box .x-reset *{box-sizing:border-box;-moz-box-sizing:border-box;-ms-box-sizing:border-box;-webkit-box-sizing:border-box}

But I have not been able to locate the exact implication of this structure.

Could any guide at this.

Thanks for any help in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Yes, it is the same thing for class selectors.
  2. Yes, the contextual rules that apply to type selectors will also apply to class selectors.
  3. Yes, they will also be applicable to id selectors.

I have seen the use of such structure in the css files of js libraries like ExtJS

.x-border-box .x-reset *{box-sizing:border-box;-moz-box-sizing:border-box;-ms-box-sizing:border-box;-webkit-box-sizing:border-box}

But I have not been able to locate the exact implication of this structure.

It means, apply that rule to all child elements of the element with the class x-reset, whose immediate or any further parent has the class x-border-box.

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2  
Thanks for the clear answer. Its perfect. –  netemp Oct 1 '11 at 19:29

Yes, they work the same. They're all simple selectors.

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Thanks alot for sharing the information. Actually I was going through the link - w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.htm - or infact, at any other link, all the examples related to contextual selectors are given using 'type' selector and nothing has been mentioned that the 'context' rules apply to all kind of selectors. This is the reason I was not being able to have a clear picture. But it seems that contextual rules are there for any kind of selectors even if the selectors are user-defined. Thanks again. –  netemp Oct 1 '11 at 19:26
    
Note that they are not a "simple selector" as that is a completely different think in CSS. A simple selector is either a type selector or universal selector followed immediately by zero or more attribute selectors, ID selectors, or pseudo-classes, in any order. But they are "uncomplicated selectors" :-) –  Gerben Oct 1 '11 at 19:30
    
@Gerben: Actually, type selectors, bare id selectors and bare class selectors are all simple selectors according to that definition. –  Chuck Oct 1 '11 at 19:37
    
@NetEmp: The examples tend to use type selectors because they're easiest to read and HTML element names will be familiar to most readers, but the text itself generally just says "selector." –  Chuck Oct 1 '11 at 19:38
    
@Chuck My bad. I though you meant '.test1 .test2' was a 'simple' selector. –  Gerben Oct 1 '11 at 19:44

Q1) What is the effect of creating selectors in the following way:

.test1 .test2{ background:red; }

This will change the background-color of an element with the class of test2 that is nested within the class of test1.

So yes.

Q2) If yes, then will all the contextual rules (+, >) etc.. for the 'type' selector will also apply for class selectors?

Yes, they apply. But there are slight differences.

For instance, the above rule is close to the same as .test1 > .test2. This targets the direct child of .test1, whereas the first rule (with just the classes) would target any .test2 descendent of a .test1, no matter who nested.

Q3) And will all these rules also be then applicable to the 'id' selectors?

Yes, id and class work the same way, expect that id targets a specific, unique element and class can be applied to multiple elements.

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Thanks Jason, but you mentioned 'Yes, mostly' so are there any exceptions? –  netemp Oct 1 '11 at 19:32
    
No, @NetEmp. I edited that out. What I wanted to write was that the contextual rules you highlighted (>, +) do slightly different things than the example above. See the edit. –  Jason Gennaro Oct 1 '11 at 19:33

You can just mix and match. So something like this:

#header h1.main a

Means; any a-element, that is a descendant of a h1 element with a classname that is 'main', that again is a descendant of any element with a ID 'header'. Note that you could just replace #header with *#header (although I would not do that)

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Thanks for the example. Its pretty helpful. –  netemp Oct 1 '11 at 19:54

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