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I have a simple Screen class in C# that has a bunch of events (with corresponding delegates) like the FadeOutEvent.

I want to port my library to Java, and I find that the mechanism for events/delegates is really cludgey. Specifically, I cannot easily write code like:

if (someVar == someVal) {
  this.FadeOutComplete += () => {
    this.ShowScreen(new SomeScreen());
  };
} else {
  this.FadeOutComplete += () => {
    this.ShowScreen(new SomeOtherScreen());
  };
}

For all you Java-only guys, essentially, what I'm whinging about is the inability to reassign the event-handling method in the current class to something else dynamically, without creating new classes; it seems that if I use interfaces, the current class must implement the interface, and I can't change the code called later.

In C#, it's common that you have code that:

  • In a constructor / early on, assign some event handler code to an event
  • Later during execution, remove that code completely
  • Often, change that original handler to different handler code

Strategy pattern can solve this (and does), albeit that I need extra classes and interfaces to do it; in C#, it's just a delcarative event/delegate and I'm done.

Is there a way to do this without inner/anonymous classes?

Edit: I just saw this SO question, which might help.

share|improve this question
    
Just search SO for [java] strategy pattern and you'll find many many examples. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 1 '11 at 21:16
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels I did. Most of them require lots of additional classes (even anonymous classes), which I really really don't like. As a C# developer, this is trivial and doesn't require classes. Sure, I can do it with private/inner classes, but why must I do it that way? –  ashes999 Oct 1 '11 at 21:20
1  
@ashes999 Umn how do you implement your event without a lambda - which is basically the same as an anonymous inner class (actually pretty much identical from its constraints and all) in c#? The largest difference apart from Javas clumsy syntax is that you need an interface to define the delegate/event. And there's no way around this since functions aren't first class objects in Java. –  Voo Oct 1 '11 at 21:45
    
@Voo lambdas are equivalent to an anonymous method, not an anonymous class. The extra interface, plus all the plumbing for adding/removing instances of your event observers, seems very clumsy. –  ashes999 Oct 1 '11 at 22:37
    
@ashes999 Yeah and the difference between an anonymous class and a method from an implementation point of view is.. minimal to say the least. The C# implementation is basically just an already implemented "interface" (which you do for Java often enough, ActionListeners, etc.; you can define own events a bit shorter yes - the usual advantage of first class functions) and hides the bookkeeping. Which obviously isn't possible, if you haven't found a way to overload operators in Java. As I said a bit clumsy, but oh well - the boiler plate code is 2 lines of code, that's not too bad. –  Voo Oct 1 '11 at 22:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Most of the time, it's done the other way round:

this.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        if (someVar == someVal) {
            showSomeScreen();
        }
        else {
            showSomeOtherScreen();
        }
    }
});

But you could do something similar to your C# code by delegating to two other objects:

private Runnable delegate;

// ...
this.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        delegate.run();
    }
});

// ...
if (someVar == someVal) {
    this.delegate = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            showSomeScreen();
        }
    };
}
else {
    this.delegate = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            showSomeOtherScreen();
        }
    };
}

Delegates were proposed by Microsoft for Java a long long time ago, and were refused by Sun. I don't remember if anonymous inner classes already existed at that time or if they were chosen as the alternative.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is the conclusion I came to too. Maybe we can still do better somehow, but I fear this is as good as it will get. –  ashes999 Oct 1 '11 at 22:39
    
Also, my example was a bit superficial; what I'm getting at is adding/removing/changing delegates often. That seems hard in Java. –  ashes999 Oct 1 '11 at 22:40

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