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I have an istream which is a reference to a giant file containing lots of subfiles, I want to be able to create a "sub" istream from the giant istream (given a position and size) referencing one part of it so that something else can load from that substream treating it just like a full istream if the file was not part of a big file.

Any ideas?

EDIT

I would prefer to avoid boost..

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

This is an example of a streambuf "filter" that reads from a contained streambuf starting at a specified location and reading up to a specified size. You create substreambuf, passing your original streambuf in and substreambuf then translates access so that everything is read from the desired location in the underlying streambuf.

Most of the overhead involved in calling sgetc and snextc from underflow and uflow should optimize away. Many extraction operators work byte by byte, so there should not be additional overhead beyond maintaining the read position within the subsection and checking for the end of the subsection. Of course, reading large chunks of data will be less efficient with this class (although that could be fixed).

This still needs improvements like testing that the requested location is within the underlying streambuf.

class substreambuf : public std::streambuf
{
public:

    substreambuf(std::streambuf *sbuf, int start, int len)
        : m_sbuf(sbuf), m_start(start), m_len(len), m_pos(0)
    {
        m_sbuf->pubseekpos(start);
        setbuf(NULL,0);
    }

protected:

    int underflow()
    {
        if (m_pos+1 >= m_len)
            return traits_type::eof();

        return m_sbuf->sgetc();
    }

    int uflow()
    {
        if (m_pos+1 >= m_len)
            return traits_type::eof();

        m_pos += 1;

        return m_sbuf->sbumpc();
    }

    std::streampos seekoff ( std::streamoff off, std::ios_base::seekdir way,
            std::ios_base::openmode which = std::ios_base::in | std::ios_base::out )
    {
        if (way == std::ios_base::beg)
            m_pos = m_start + off;
        else if (way == std::ios_base::cur)
            m_pos += off;
        else if (way == std::ios_base::end)
            m_pos = m_len + off;

        if (m_pos < 0 || m_pos >= m_len)
            return -1;

        if (m_sbuf->pubseekpos(m_start + m_pos, std::ios_base::beg, which) == -1)
            return -1;

        return m_pos;
    }

    std::streampos seekpos ( std::streampos sp,
            std::ios_base::openmode which = std::ios_base::in | std::ios_base::out)
    {
        m_pos += sp;

        if (m_pos < 0 || m_pos >= m_len)
            return -1;

        if (m_sbuf->pubseekpos(sp,which) == -1)
            return -1;

        return m_pos;
    }

private:
    std::streambuf *m_sbuf;
    std::streampos m_start;
    std::streamsize m_len;
    std::streampos m_pos;
};

It can be used like this

using namespace std;

void somefunc(ifstream &bigifs)
{
    substreambuf sbuf(bigifs.rdbuf(),100,100);
    //new istream with the substreambuf as its streambuf
    istream isub(&sbuf);

    //use isub normally
}

This was inspired by Filtering Streambufs

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1  
The underflow method should not update m_read, should it? –  uranix Aug 21 '13 at 12:27
    
The code example provided is fraught with issues and should not be considered the correct answer. The underflow function should not be incrementing read. The uflow return value should be sbuf->sbumpc();, not m_sbuf->snextc();. The code provided also doesn't count seek operations towards the read value (the usefulness of which is questionable with to begin with). –  cmbasnett Mar 7 '14 at 5:05
    
I fixed those issues. Feel free to edit some more if I missed anything else. @cmbasnett, besides the implementation mistakes are you saying this is just the wrong way to do what the poster asked? –  BHS Mar 8 '14 at 7:25

I've done something like this using the Boost.Iostreams library. Look under Tutorial|Writing Devices. The idea is to create a "device" class which implements the low-level interface (read/write/seek) and then instantiate an istream/ostream derived class using your device class to do the actual I/O.

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I would kind like to avoid boost... –  Justin Meiners Oct 1 '11 at 22:32

All iostreams put most of their custom logic in their streambuf specializations. fstream (or basic_fstream) initializes istream with an instance of file_buf. Same for stringstream (stringbuf). If you want to roll your own substream stream, you can do it by implementing your own streambuf in terms of a parent stream.

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Just a little idea : If you have control over the client side of the code (i.e. the part that uses the input stream), I suggest you modify it to accept two additional parameters, like illustrated below :

// Old code
void ClassUsingInput::SetInput(std::streambuf & inputbuf)
{
   // Implementation ...
}

Can become :

// New code
void ClassUsingInput::SetInput(std::streambuf & inputbuf, std::streampos position, std::streamsize size) 
{
    inputbuf.pubseekpos(position) ;
    // internally use size to detect end-of-substream
}
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