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I currently have the code:

fleechance = random.randrange(1,5)
print fleechance
if fleechance == 1 or 2:
    print "You failed to run away!"
elif fleechance == 4 or 3:
    print "You got away safely!"

fleechance is constantly printing as 3 or 4, but I continue to get the result "You failed to run away!" ,can anyone tell me why this is happening?

share|improve this question
1  
This is not equivalent to if fleechance == 1 or fleechance == 2. It's equivalent to saying if fleechance ==1: if 2, which will always be true because if 2 is true. – birryree Oct 2 '11 at 0:24
2  
What Python tutorial are you using? Where have you seen code like this? Can you provide a like or a reference? This code is quite bad, and it's important to know where you got the idea that it might be meaningful. – S.Lott Oct 2 '11 at 0:43
    
I have a book, but I didn't get the code directly from there, it just seemed that it would work, so I don't think that it's really the fault of the tutorial. – Dan Doe Oct 3 '11 at 0:53
up vote 9 down vote accepted

The expression fleechance == 1 or 2 is equivalent to (fleechance == 1) or (2). The number 2 is always considered “true”.

Try this:

if fleechance in (1, 2):

EDIT: In your situation (only 2 possibilities), the following will be even better:

if fleechance <= 2:
    print "You failed to run away!"
else:
    print "You got away safely!"
share|improve this answer

Try

if fleechance == 1 or fleechance == 2:
    print "You failed to run away!"
elif fleechance == 4 or fleechance == 3:
    print "You got away safely!"

Alternatively, if those are the only possibilites, you can do

if fleechance <= 2:
    print "You failed to run away!"
else:
    print "You got away safely!"
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thank you so much. It worked perfectly. – Dan Doe Oct 2 '11 at 0:22
    
If you used my answer, please click the check mark next to it to accept it. – Alex Bliskovsky Oct 2 '11 at 0:24

The if statement is working as designed, the problem is that order of operations is causing this code to do something other than that you want.

The easiest fix would be to say:

if fleechance == 1 or fleechance == 2:
    print "You failed to run away!"
elif fleechance == 3 or fleechance == 4:
    print "You got away safely!"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that works, I didn't know about the order of operations. – Dan Doe Oct 2 '11 at 0:24

Because you're not asking whether fleechance is 1 or fleechance is 2; you're asking whether

  1. fleechance is 1, or
  2. 2 is non-zero.

Of course, that second part of the condition is always true. Try

if fleechance == 1 or fleechance == 2:
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for explaining it further, I'll try not to make the same mistake in the future. – Dan Doe Oct 2 '11 at 0:25

The way you wrote your if statements is wrong. You tell python to check if fleechance equals 1 is true or if 2 is true. A non-zero integer always means true in a condition. You should wrote :

fleechance = random.randrange(1,5)
print fleechance
if fleechance == 1 or fleechance == 2:
    print "You failed to run away!"
elif fleechance == 4 or fleechance == 3:
    print "You got away safely!"
share|improve this answer

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