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Can you help me figure out this code: onCreate(xMsg) is called by the WindowProcedure on a WM_NCCREATE message. The problem is within the iterator dereferencing. I can't seem to set the iterator to the list's begin() and then get the contents of the iterator, which should be a pointer to a string which could be used with ->c_str() in a MessageBox.

class MyController
{
public:
    MyController() { }
    ~MyController() { }
    void onCreate(xMessage *msg);

protected:
    std::list<std::string *> m_stringlist;
    std::list<std::string *>::iterator m_stringlistiter;
};

void onCreate(xMessage *msg)
{
    std::string *first_string = new std::string("Hello world");
    m_stringlist.push_back(first_string);
    // This is where my iterator comes into play and it doesn't seem to do the trick.

    m_stringlistiter = m_stringlist.begin();
    MessageBox(NULL, (*m_stringlistiter)->c_str(), "Title", MB_OK);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Runtime error? Compile time error? Error message? –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 2 '11 at 2:23
2  
Any reason you're not using std::string directly but a pointer? std::string has safe copy (and now move) semantics so it's safer to use within a container than a pointer to it or a char*. –  Daemin Oct 2 '11 at 2:32
    
Your code looks fine. What does "not working right" mean??? –  AndreyT Oct 2 '11 at 2:39
    
The runtime error is just that it has an error and decides to check it for solutions via Microsoft I guess. As for using a container for a string, I just know I've run into this problem before and couldn't figure it out and I'm just sort of a stickler for figuring it out. –  Dean Oct 2 '11 at 2:41
    
If you assign const char* striter = (*m_stringlistiter)->c_str(); in your code, do you get "Hello world"? It seems to work for me... –  Gnawme Oct 2 '11 at 3:12

1 Answer 1

We aren't given the full example, but I assume that you are doing other manipulations in between the creation and use of the iterator.

Iterators are not guaranteed to be valid after varied operations on the container. You should not save them.

I'm willing to bet that this will work?

class MyController
{
public:
    MyController() : title("Hello World") {}
    void onCreate(xMessage *msg);
    {
         MessageBox(NULL, title.c_str(), "Title", MB_OK);
    }
protected:
    std::string title;  // generic lists of strings with 
                        // magic indexes are hard to maintain.
};

This is easier to read and debug too, which costs a lot more than any other part of software development.

You should use iterators as temporary objects, for the most part. Rarely do they extend outside of a function/method's scope.

struct some_struct {

  some_struct() {
    gui_text.push_back( std::string("Hello World!") );
  }
  void some_function() {
    std::list<std::string>::iterator iter = gui_text.begin();
    for (; iter != gui_text.end(); iter++) {
      std::cout << *iter << std::endl;
    }
  }

  std::list<std::string> gui_text;
};

Things like adding, deleting, etc from the container will invalidate iterators. So just recreate the iterator at each point. Strings and iterators are pretty lightweight, so you don't need to worry about optimizing in this way. Really.

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically what the problem was, but I think I needed a static declared object. –  Dean Oct 13 '11 at 23:36

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