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In C++, how can I read the contents of a file into an array of strings? I need this for a file that consists of pairs of chars separated by spaces as follows:

cc cc cc cc cc cc
cc cc cc cc cc cc
cc cc cc cc cc cc
cc cc cc cc cc cc

c can be any char, including space! Attempt:

ifstream myfile("myfile.txt");
int numPairs = 24;
string myarray[numPairs];

for( int i = 0; i < numPairs; i++) {
    char read;
    string store = "";

    myfile >> read;
    store += read;

    myfile >> read;
    store += read;

    myfile >> read;

    myarray[i] = store;
}

The problem is that this just skips spaces alltogether, hence leading to wrong values. What do I need to change to make it recognize spaces?

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2 Answers 2

That's expected behavior, since operator>>, by defaults, skips whitespace.

The solution is to use the get method, which is a low level operation that reads raw bytes from the stream without any formatting.

char read;
if(myfile.get(read)) // add some safety while we're at it
    store += read; 

By the way, VLAs (arrays with a non constant size) are non standard in C++. You should either specify a constant size, or use a container such as vector.

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If the input is exact like you say the following code will work:

ifstream myfile("myfile.txt");
int numPairs = 24;
string myarray[numPairs];

EDIT: if the input is from STDIN
for( int i = 0; i < numPairs; i++) {
    myarray[i] = "";
    myarray[i] += getchar();
    myarray[i]+= getchar();
    getchar(); // the space or end of line

}

EDIT: If we don't now the number of pairs beforehand
      we shoud use a resizable data structure, e.g. vector<string>
vector<string> list;
// read from file stream
while (!myfile.eof()) {
    string temp = "";
    temp += myfile.get();
    temp += myfile.get();
    list.push_back(temp);
    myfile.get();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great. Now what if I don't know the number of pairs beforehand? –  Ben Oct 2 '11 at 4:18
    
Thank you for your answers, one final question: The way you are using the vector, it gets resized all the time, doesn't it? The file I will be using in the end contains a bit more than the 24 pairs I used for the example , so is there a way to automatically determine the size needed before reading the pairs? (Also, what I need in my program is the number of "columns" and "rows" in the file - I guess I can use a counter for the cols related to myfile.get() and use if to check for \n manually for the rowcounter - but that is while reading the pairs, what about beforehand?) –  Ben Oct 2 '11 at 5:39
    
Never loop on eof. Just test the stream itself: while(myfile). –  Etienne de Martel Oct 2 '11 at 15:09
    
@Ben I don't know how to do that without reading the file. You can either indicate the number of pairs or rows and cols at the beginning of the file or use the method you describe to know the rows and cols but don't store the pairs, when you finish, close the file and reopen the file but now you have the number of rows and cols. It's all I can think ;) –  rendon Oct 3 '11 at 0:09
    
Well, when I'm using the vector as you suggested, I can do both reading and increasing row/colcounter in one step since I don't need to wory about the size. Still I would like to be able to initialise the size of the vector to some sensible startvalue. How can that be done? Could I mazbe change the actual filesize of the textfile itself somehow and then based on that allocate memory for my vector before I start all the reading? –  Ben Oct 3 '11 at 14:57

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