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I have a file called init.php which I want to get automatically included in each and every HTTP request coming to my server. My server is on LAMP configuration with PHP 5.3 and fast CGI. Any method to achieve this is welcome.

What I have already tried:

I have already tried the auto_prepend_file method with .htaccess file but no success.

I have done the following.

.htaccess File:

php_value auto_prepend_file /home/user/domain.com/init.php

init.php file:

<?php
echo "statement 2";
?>

index.php file:

statement 1

So, now if I visit http://domain.com/ I find only statement 1 getting printed. statement 2 is not getting printed.

Kindly let me know how to correct this or if there is any other way to achieve this.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My server is on LAMP configuration with PHP 5.3 and fast CGI.

You can not set PHP ini directives with the .htaccess method with FCGI/CGI. You need to apply the changes within the php.ini or better the user ini files Docs instead.

Place a file called .user.ini into the document root and add the auto_prepend_fileDocs directive in there:

auto_prepend_file = /home/user/domain.com/init.php

This should do the job for you.

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Thanks @hakre... .user.ini works good! –  Goje87 Oct 2 '11 at 16:24
    
That's for what is has been made for :) –  hakre Oct 2 '11 at 16:29
    
Is the prepend file also executed when the user tries to access a non-php file, such as an image? –  Rapti Mar 18 at 12:42
1  
@Rapti: It is always prepended when PHP code is executed. Prepending PHP code in front of a binary image file does not make much sense unless the PHP runtime then "executes" such image (that is push it out via STDOUT, so even what you ask about is not much likely, it is possible. Short answer probably is no what you ask for, but can be yes but that yes must not mean what you think it could mean) –  hakre Mar 18 at 13:28
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My server is on LAMP configuration with PHP 5.3 and fast CGI.

fast CGI means no .htaccess directive would work. Change your php.ini instead.

automatically included in each and every HTTP request

with auto_prepend_file you obviously can't include a php file to "each and every HTTP request", but to requests routed to PHP files only.

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