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I have a table which I would like to apply a price rank for each record.

1 for the highest, 2 for the next highest, 3 for the next highest.

Currently I'm selecting each row and then updating each record individually like so:

Usage: function get_list('table','order field','order direction') - returns associative array

foreach(get_list('ps2','price','DESC') as $p)
{
    $ct++;
    $s = "UPDATE `ps2` 
            SET `price_rank` = '".$ct."' 
            WHERE `db_id` = '".$p[db_id]."'
            LIMIT 1";
    mysql_query($s);
}

As I have many records this is extremely slow, is there another way?

Edit: Here's one way which is way faster but is there a better way?

ALTER TABLE `ps2` DROP `price_rank` ;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` CHANGE `db_id` `db_id` INT( 11 ) NOT NULL ;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` DROP PRIMARY KEY ;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` ORDER BY `price_per_pax_after_tax` DESC;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` ADD `price_rank` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` ORDER BY `db_id`;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` CHANGE `price_rank` `price_rank` INT( 11 ) NOT NULL ;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` DROP PRIMARY KEY ;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` ADD PRIMARY KEY ( `db_id` ) ;
ALTER TABLE `ps2` CHANGE `db_id` `db_id` INT( 11 ) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ;
share|improve this question
1  
You are not giving enough information here, we need to see how do you calculate the price ranks in order to apply them to the table. At first glance, it looks like it should be possible to do with an update/case statement but again, without more details it's difficult to give you a concrete answer. –  Icarus Oct 2 '11 at 13:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Personally I would handle the ranking in the DML statements using aggregate functions like MAX and limit and offset to get the results I want. Also when the price changes you will have to repopulate the rank values if you store them in the table. The current methods above do not handle identical prices.

You can return the rank without storing it with this

SELECT p.db_id, COUNT(DISTINCT p2.price) as Rank 
FROM packages_sorted as p 
JOIN packages_sorted as p2 ON p.price <= p2.price 
GROUP BY p.db_id 

If you still want to store the rank,

UPDATE FROM packages_sorted as p JOIN (
    SELECT p.db_id, COUNT(DISTINCT p2.price) as PriceRank 
    FROM packages_sorted as p 
    JOIN packages_sorted as p2 ON p.price <= p2.price 
    GROUP BY p.db_id
) as pSub ON p.db_id = pSub.db_id 
SET p.price_rank = pSub.PriceRank 

Both of those statements handle identicle prices with the count distinct.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but with over a million records the first query is still running (after 10 minutes!) The dropping PRIMARY KEY technique may be ugly but it's over in a second. –  Andy Gee Oct 2 '11 at 15:04
    
Consider an index for price and db_id. Also I missed the p. from the Group By clause. –  Russell Hart Oct 2 '11 at 15:10
    
I had the indexes in place and figured out the p.db_id. The key to this is time, I'm replacing 10,000,000 records every hour and then processing them. Thanks a lot for your help but as the tables are rebuilt every hour I think I'll have to stick with dropping the primary and replacing it method. I also agree, this calculation should be done with aggregate functions but I'm writing middleware to generate CSV files and I'm stuck with this ludicrous replication of data. –  Andy Gee Oct 2 '11 at 15:36

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