Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I started to use OAuth with Python and Django. I need it for Google APIs. I working on localhost, so I can't register a domain for url-callback. I've read about that Google OAuth could be used with anonymous domain. Can't find, how and where I can do that?

Edit:

I have this view:

def authentication(request):
    CONSUMER_KEY = 'xxxxx'
    CONSUMER_SECRET = 'xxxxx'
    SCOPES = ['https://docs.google.com/feeds/', ]

    client = gdata.docs.client.DocsClient(source='apiapp')
    oauth_callback_url = 'http://%s/get_access_token' % request.META.get('HTTP_HOST')
    request_token = client.GetOAuthToken(
      SCOPES, oauth_callback_url, CONSUMER_KEY, consumer_secret=CONSUMER_SECRET)
   domain = '127.0.0.1:8000'
   return HttpResponseRedirect(
        request_token.generate_authorization_url(google_apps_domain=domain))

And this error:

Sorry, you've reached a login page for a domain that isn't using Google Apps. Please check the web address and try again.

Registered via https://code.google.com/apis/console/

Edit:

CONSUMER_KEY = 'xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx'
CONSUMER_SECRET = 'xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx'
SCOPES = ['https://docs.google.com/feeds/', ]
DOMAIN = 'localhost:8000'


def authentication(request):    
    client = gdata.docs.client.DocsClient(source='apiapp')
    oauth_callback_url = 'http://%s/get_access_token' % DOMAIN

    request_token = client.GetOAuthToken(SCOPES,
                                     oauth_callback_url,
                                     CONSUMER_KEY,
                                     consumer_secret=CONSUMER_SECRET)

    return HttpResponseRedirect(
        request_token.generate_authorization_url())


def verify(request):
    client = gdata.docs.client.DocsClient(source='apiapp')
    f = open('/home/i159/.ssh/id_rsa')
    RSA_KEY = f.read()
    f.close()

    oauth_callback_url = 'http://%s/get_access_token' % DOMAIN

    request_token = client.GetOAuthToken(SCOPES,
                                     oauth_callback_url,
                                     CONSUMER_KEY,
                                     rsa_private_key=RSA_KEY)
    return HttpResponseRedirect(
        request_token.generate_authorization_url(google_apps_domain=DOMAIN))

The error:

Unable to obtain OAuth request token: 400, Consumer does not have a cert: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.apps.googleusercontent.com

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just to be clear, you can use the web application flow with localhost while developing on either OAuth 1.0 or OAuth 2.0. OAuth 2.0 should be preferred as it's the mechanism we are focussed on. The user experience for OAuth 2.0 is going to be substantially better.

There's nothing stopping you from using localhost as your callback URL. I do this myself all the time. You just need to make sure the callback URL matches exactly, including any port numbers, and you can't deploy your application that way for obvious reasons. Installed applications are more complicated, but if you're doing something with Django, it's possible to take advantage of the fact that OAuth 2.0 is a bearer-token system. As long as you're keeping the refresh token server-side, you can authenticate with your own application out-of-band and then send the bearer token to the installed application. Your installed application will have roughly a one-hour window in which to make calls before you'll need to repeat the process. This can happen transparently to the user in most cases. Transmission of the bearer token should happen over an encrypted channel.

share|improve this answer
    
Bob, I appreciate your attention to my problem. I moved to one step in my issue with @Stanpol 's advice. But I still have this problem, on /get_access_token/?oauth_verifier= I've got an error: Consumer does not have a cert... I made changes to my question, consisting of the latest code. I would be very grateful for the code example, how do you do this, since Google bit confusing me. –  I159 Oct 3 '11 at 15:40
2  
Have you tried playing around with the OAuth Playground? It may help to give you more insight into how OAuth 1 works. –  Bob Aman Oct 4 '11 at 13:05
    
And just to be clear, you cannot manage the localhost domain because it's not reachable from the manage domains tool, which is where you would upload an X.509 certificate. The domain has to be verified before you can upload a certificate for it and that can't be done with localhost. This is just one more reason you should be using OAuth 2. I believe OAuth 1 can only be done with localhost if you're using the HMAC-SHA1 signature method. If you absolutely must use OAuth 1, you're going to need to switch your signature method. –  Bob Aman Oct 4 '11 at 13:12

OAuth 1.0 for Installed Applications

Besides that, you probably don't want to include your actual CONSUMER_KEY and CONSUMER_SECRET in the example code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for your good advice about what NOT to include in the example code. I thought OAuth 2.0 was the standard now, but I'm guessing it is still experimental in this context based on your answer? –  Ellie Kesselman Oct 2 '11 at 20:31
    
Yes, you're so right @Cody Hess. I just read this stackoverflow.com/questions/5408971/… and there's lots more all over Google groups. OAuth 1.0 is the way, for now. –  Ellie Kesselman Oct 2 '11 at 20:37
    
@FeralOink The 2.0 documentation also mentions installed applications with a special redirect URL, but there's a grossness where your user has to copy-paste an access token from a browser window. –  Cody Hess Oct 2 '11 at 20:45
1  
I work for Google. Please use OAuth 2.0, not OAuth 1.0. Our OAuth 2.0 implementation is actively supported and is currently the best way to authorize against a Google API. Don't let the "Experimental" tag on the API intimidate you. See the docs for the different application flows we support on OAuth 2.0: code.google.com/apis/accounts/docs/OAuth2.html –  Bob Aman Oct 3 '11 at 13:48
1  
@FeralOink Experimental really just means that breaking changes may happen, but even so, that's not going to be common. The advantages of OAuth 2.0 vastly outweigh the risks here. However, to clarify, "Experimental" and "Labs" aren't all that different. "Experimental" just means that there aren't really any formal promises about reliability, availability, or breaking changes. But this is Google. Our "experiments" are often the preferred way of doing things. :-) –  Bob Aman Oct 6 '11 at 8:23

Try your code without arguments:

return HttpResponseRedirect(request_token.generate_authorization_url())
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your advice. Google has requested allow for access to documents. This is it I think. And now Google has redirected me to 127.0.0.1:8000/get_access_token?oauth_verifier=... This is error for me now, but this is movement. –  I159 Oct 3 '11 at 7:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.