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I have an interface like

interface IBasicListNode<T> {
  /**
   * Returns the current element
   */
  public T getElement();

  /**
   * Gets the next ListNode. Returns null if theres no next element
   */
  public IBasicListNode<T> getNext();

  /**
   * Sets the next ListNode 
   */
  public void setNext(IBasicListNode<T> node);
}

And a class:

class BasicListNode<T> implements IBasicListNode<T> {
  protected T _elem;
  protected BasicListNode<T> _next;

  public T getElement() {
    return this._elem;
  }

  public BasicListNode<T> getNext() {
    return this._next;
  }

  public void setNext(BasicListNode<T> node) {
    this._next = node;
  }

  /**
   * Transverse through ListNodes until getNext() returns null
   */ 
  public BasicListNode<T> getLast() {
    BasicListNode<T> tmp = this;
    while (tmp != null) {
      tmp = tmp.getNext();
    }
    return tmp;
  }
}

Error:

jiewmeng@JM-PC:/labs/Uni/CS1020/Lab/03/prob 2/LinkedList$ javac BasicListNode.java 
BasicListNode.java:1: BasicListNode is not abstract and does not override 
abstract method setNext(IBasicListNode<T>) in IBasicListNode

class BasicListNode<T> implements IBasicListNode<T> {
^

Is java not detecting that BasicListNode<T> implements IBasicListNode<T>?

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Note that the signature for your setNext method is different in the super and in the concrete class, so you´re not overriding it. –  Yar Oct 2 '11 at 13:29
    
@Yar, I updated the Interface & Error , it still doesn't work –  Jiew Meng Oct 2 '11 at 14:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem here is that you need to implement the method:

public void setNext(IBasicListNode<T> node);

Note the type of the parameter node is in fact IBasicListNode<T> and not simply BasicListNode<T>.

Take a look at the way ArrayList is implemented (here). It implements the Collection interface. Yet there is no addAll(ArrayList<T> list) method. Instead it must implement the Collection interface and thus it must implement a addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) method.

In you example you want to change your interface to read as follows:

public void setNext(IBasicListNode<T> node);

Then implement the method in your BasicListNode class as follows:

public void setNext(IBasicListNode<T> node) {
    this._next = node;
}

*Note: Your _next variable must now be of type IBasicListNode<T> or you must some how check for and cast to BasicListNode.

EDIT: To be clear ArrayList could in fact contain a method called addAll(ArrayList<T> list) if it wanted to but that is optional. However, it absolutely must contain a method called addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) in order to fully implement the Collection interface.

The take away of the story is that when implementing an interface your class must contain a method signature that is identical to the interface it is implementing. That is it must have the same return type, the same method name and the parameter list must have the same types and order.

EDIT 2: To use instanceof with generics you will need to use the wildcard <?> as follows:

if(node instanceof BasicListNode<?>) {
    this._next = (BasicListNode<T>)node;
}

This is needed as <T> is not a type that can be checked against at compile time since you don't know what type will be used at runtime. The <?> allows you accept a BasicListNode of any type generic.

As to why the getNext() method works despite having a slightly different return type has to do with the power of generics. There are a lot of special cases when using generics and requires a little more time to understand it all. For more details I would recommend looking up generics and perhaps taking a look at this post here. The accepted answer will only make things a little more confusing so I recommend taking a look at the second answer provided by Cam

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the great explaination. But could you elaborate how is ? extends E used? –  Jiew Meng Oct 3 '11 at 11:14
1  
@jiewmeng <? extends E> is used to allow a generic type to be any object that is a subclass of E. As an example, consider a method called draw(ArrayList<? extends Shape> shape) that draws any shape that extends the Shape class. Using the <? extends Shape> wildcard you could pass it an ArrayList containing a Circle, Rectangle or any other shape as long as it extends the Shape class. –  New Guy Oct 3 '11 at 14:05
    
I am wondering, if is it better design that my class stick with allowing IBasicListNode<T> instead of say expect BasicListNode<T> (for arguments) if my function only needs to work with methods defined in IBasicListNode<T>? Then what about return? Should I always return a more specific type so there will be room to cast it to a more generic type? –  Jiew Meng Oct 4 '11 at 22:10
    
It appears confusing if my method signature shows I expects a IBasicListNode and throws an exception saying I require a BasicListNode. I found that if I use IBasicListNode in my implementation, I will encounter problems/confusion if I require functionality in BasicListNode –  Jiew Meng Oct 4 '11 at 22:20

your setnext() in the interface class should be

public void setNext(BasicListNode<T> node);

Its missing the argument that's implemented in the class. Change the interface to match the class or the class to match the interface and it will stop complaining.

Your interface should be:

public interface IBasicListNode<T> {
  /**
   * Returns the current element
   */
  public T getElement();

  /**
   * Gets the next ListNode. Returns null if theres no next element
   */
  public IBasicListNode<T> getNext();

  /**
   * Sets the next ListNode 
   */
  public void setNext(IBasicListNode<T> node);
}

For your next error remember to put

public infront of
public class BasicListNode<t> implements BasicListNodeI<T>

and

public interface IBasicListNode<T>

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my post with a corrected Interface & new(but similar) error –  Jiew Meng Oct 2 '11 at 14:12
    
Is it updated? the code looks exactly the same –  Serdalis Oct 2 '11 at 14:38
    
Updated answer, you forgot to add public to the class AND the interface. –  Serdalis Oct 2 '11 at 14:44
    
ok, I will add in the public, which somehow seems to be always left out by the lecturers/teaching staff of my school when they give "skeleton" files, any reason why? –  Jiew Meng Oct 2 '11 at 22:41
    
About the checking will it be something like pastie.org/2629109. Then I am thinking I should throw an exception in else? But which one? InvalidArgumentException? Also notice I got an error doing instanceof BasicListNode<T> must use instanceof BasicListNode are they the same? Why does public BasicListNode<T> getLast() work? –  Jiew Meng Oct 2 '11 at 22:45

In your interface:

public void setNext();

in your class:

public void setNext(BasicListNode<T> node)
share|improve this answer

It's simply You haven't reimplemented method public void setNext() without arguments!

If you need it to don't complain, change your interface to declare setNext like this

public void setNext(BasicListNode<T> node);

or implement interface like it is declared ;-)

share|improve this answer

Your interface has the following method:

public void setNext(IBasicListNode<T> node);

But your class has this one:

public void setNext(BasicListNode<T> node) {

The contract is thus not respected: the interface method accepts any implementation of IBasicListNode<T> as argument, whereas the class method only accepts the specific BasicListNode<T> implementation.

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