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I have the following method:

public static List<List<String>> createObject() {
    List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = new LinkedList<List<String>>();
    List<String> listOfStrings = new LinkedList<String>();
    //do some populating on the lists here
    listOfListOfStrings.add(listOfStrings);
    return listOfListOfStrings;
}

Now I want to be able to use an ArrayList/Vector/Stack instead of the LinkedList (and do different combinations if needed. I read some posts on generics regarding this issue and I found out that using a factory pattern for creating those is most suited (since I don't want reflection, and since using the generic <T extends List<K>, K extends List<String>> would not work.). So the solution I came up with is the following:

public class Tester {
public static void main(String[] args){
    checkGenericsOfLists();
}

public static void checkGenericsOfLists(){
    List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = createObject(new LinkedListFactory<List<String>>(), new LinkedListFactory<String>());
    print(listOfListOfStrings);
    translate(listOfListOfStrings);
    print(listOfListOfStrings);
}

public static List<List<String>> createObject(ListFactorable mainListFactory, ListFactorable subListsFactory) {
    List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = mainListFactory.create();//new LinkedList<List<String>>();
    List<String> listOfStrings = subListsFactory.create();//new LinkedList<String>();
    listOfStrings.add("A");
    listOfListOfStrings.add(listOfStrings);
    return listOfListOfStrings;
}

public static void transform(List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings){ 
            //do some abuse on the lists here.
}}

This solution gives warnings:

ListFactorable is a raw type. References to generic type ListFactorable should be parameterized

This is for the createObject method signature. And:

Type safety: The expression of type List needs unchecked conversion to conform to List of List of String>>

This is for the lines where the factory invokes the create() method.

But if I use this one:

public static List<List<String>> createObject(ListFactorable<List<List<String>>, List<String>> mainListFactory, ListFactorable<List<String>, String> subListsFactory) {
    List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = mainListFactory.create();//new LinkedList<List<String>>();
    List<String> list = subListsFactory.create();//new LinkedList<String>();
    list.add("A");
    listOfListOfStrings.add(list);
    return listOfListOfStrings;
}

I get compiler error:

The method createObject(ListFactorable<List<List<String>>,List<String>>, ListFactorable<List<String>,String>) in the type Tester is not applicable for the arguments (LinkedListFactory<List<String>>, LinkedListFactory<String>)

Is there any way I can make the compiler not throw warning or error and have those lists instantiated without the createObject method being aware of the List implementation used (during compile time)?!

Cheers,
Despot

EDIT: Excuse me for not posting the rest of the classes (very silly of me:)). Here we go:

public interface ListFactorable<T extends List<K>, K> {
T create();}

public class LinkedListFactory<K> implements ListFactorable<LinkedList<K>, K> {
public LinkedList<K> create(){
    return new LinkedList<K>();
}}

EDIT2 (Eugene take on issue):

public interface EugeneListFactorable<T extends List<?>> {T create();}

public class EugeneLinkedListFactory implements EugeneListFactorable<LinkedList<?>> {
    public LinkedList<?> create(){
        return new LinkedList<List<?>>();
    }
}
public static void checkGenericsOfLists2(){
    List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = createObject(new EugeneLinkedListFactory(), new EugeneLinkedListFactory());
    translate(listOfListOfStrings);
}

Compiler error:

    - Type mismatch: cannot convert from LinkedList<?> to List<List<String>>
- Bound mismatch: The generic method createObject(EugeneListFactorable<N>, EugeneListFactorable<M>) of type 
 Tester is not applicable for the arguments (EugeneLinkedListFactory, EugeneLinkedListFactory). The inferred type LinkedList<?> 
 is not a valid substitute for the bounded parameter <N extends List<List<String>>>

Please do try to compile and run the example I posted and your solution. Its a test class which you can easily run on ur IDE. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
could you post ListFactorable class ? and possibly an SSCCE..And note that createObject first parameter doesn't have a name. –  Heisenbug Oct 2 '11 at 14:03
    
Please post LinkedListFactory and ListFactorable definitions. –  Andrey Oct 2 '11 at 14:30
    
@Heisenbug "post ListFactorable" done! createObject has a first parameter name - scroll to the right (and watch carefully the generic). What is a SSCCE?! –  despot Oct 2 '11 at 18:29
    
@Andrey "post LinkedListFactory and ListFactorable definitions" done! –  despot Oct 2 '11 at 18:30
    
@despot: sscce.org –  Heisenbug Oct 2 '11 at 19:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The followin stuff "works on my machine" without warnings or errors. What is beyond my perception is the reason for all the fuss - see the seconds codeblock.

public class Tester {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        checkGenericsOfLists();
    }

    public static void checkGenericsOfLists() {
        List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = createObject(
                new LinkedListFactory<List<String>>(),
                new LinkedListFactory<String>());
        transform(listOfListOfStrings);
    }

    public static List<List<String>> createObject(
            ListFactorable<List<List<String>>, List<String>> mainListFactory, 
            ListFactorable<List<String>, String> subListsFactory
    ) 
    {
        List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = mainListFactory.create();
        List<String> listOfStrings = subListsFactory.create();
        listOfStrings.add("A");
        listOfListOfStrings.add(listOfStrings);
        return listOfListOfStrings;
    }

    public static void transform(List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings) {
        // do some abuse on the lists here.
        System.out.println(listOfListOfStrings);
    }

    public interface ListFactorable<T extends List<K>, K> {
        T create();
    }

    static public class LinkedListFactory<K> implements ListFactorable<List<K>, K> {
        public LinkedList<K> create() {
            return new LinkedList<K>();
        }
    }
}

This solution is a little bit cleaner leaving out some generics noise.

public class Tester2 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        checkGenericsOfLists();
    }

    public static void checkGenericsOfLists() {
        List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = createObject(
                new LinkedListFactory<List<String>>(),
                new LinkedListFactory<String>());
        transform(listOfListOfStrings);
    }

    public static List<List<String>> createObject(
            ListFactory<List<String>> mainListFactory, 
            ListFactory<String> subListsFactory
    ) 
    {
        List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings = mainListFactory.create();
        List<String> listOfStrings = subListsFactory.create();
        listOfStrings.add("A");
        listOfListOfStrings.add(listOfStrings);
        return listOfListOfStrings;
    }

    public static void transform(List<List<String>> listOfListOfStrings) {
        // do some abuse on the lists here.
        System.out.println(listOfListOfStrings);
    }

    public interface ListFactory<T> {
        List<T> create();
    }

    static public class LinkedListFactory<T> implements ListFactory<T> {
        public List<T> create() {
            return new LinkedList<T>();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: it looks fine. –  Heisenbug Oct 2 '11 at 19:14
    
The simplification in the generics in the factory interface and the interface return reference type (bad design on my part to return the implementation reference type) work great! thanks. –  despot Oct 2 '11 at 19:57

This won't exactly solve your problem, but it will lend itself to finding the solution faster.

When you have anything that looks like this X> consider refactoring into a class. I'll provide an example. You look like you're using transations. Now I don't know exactly what your goals are, because you haven't stated them, but one common way to do it would be:

List<String> english = new LinkedList<String>();
List<String> french = new LinkedList<String>();
List<String> spanish = new LinkedList<String>();

List<List<String>> languages = new LinkedList<List<String>>();
languages.add(english);
languages.add(french);
languages.add(spanish);

for(String word : someWordList) {
    for(List<String> language : languages) {
         // oh snap! I really have no idea what language I'm working in...
         // I could do something silly like make list.get(0) be the language
         // name, but that seems lame
    }
}

What would be better would be something like this:

class Language {
    final String language;
    final Map<String,String> english2current;
    Language(String language, Set<String> words) {
        this.language = language;
        english2current = new HashMap<String,String>();
        Translator t = TranslatorFactory.getTranslator(language);
        for(String word : words) english2current.put(word,t.translate(word));
    }
}

Collection<String> wordSet() {
    return english2current.values();
}

Now without seeing more of your implementation it's hard to see exactly what you're doing wrong. But WHATEVER you're doing, look at removing any nested generics and instead trying to isolate them into classes. This will allow you to consolidate behavior in an object oriented manner, and better organize your logic so you can focus on what it's supposed to do instead of the semantics of generics.

share|improve this answer
    
Lets say I create a ListOfStrings class which has a List<String> memeber variable. At the point where I need to enter something in the list (in the createObject method), I will again face the creation issue, at which point I will again need to instantiate this class 1.either by providing the List implementation in the constructor - back to square 1 or 2.or by providing a generic in the ListOfStrings class which will lead me with the issue with the generics. Btw, I liked your idea on using a special class, but you should provide a better solution regardless of implementation - look at question. –  despot Oct 2 '11 at 18:14

You need to properly ListFactorable class:

public class ListFactorable<T extends List<?>> {
  public T create() {
    ...
  }
}

Then createObject method could look something like this:

public static <N extends List<List<String>>,M extends List<String>> N createObject( //
        ListFactorable<N> mainListFactory, //
        ListFactorable<M> subListsFactory) {
    N listOfListOfStrings = mainListFactory.create();//new LinkedList<List<String>>();
    M listOfStrings = subListsFactory.create();//new LinkedList<String>();
    listOfStrings.add("A");
    listOfListOfStrings.add(listOfStrings);
    return listOfListOfStrings;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wrote an edit with the proposal you gave me. Unfortunately I couldn't get a workable solution. Please do check it out and try to run the test program with whatever solution you have. Thanks! –  despot Oct 2 '11 at 18:46

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