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I've table that contains some buy/sell data, with around 8M records in it:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Transactions](
[id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[itemId] [bigint] NOT NULL,
[dt] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[count] [int] NOT NULL,
[price] [float] NOT NULL,
[platform] [char](1) NOT NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]

Every X mins my program gets new transactions for each itemId and I need to update it. My first solution is two step DELETE+INSERT:

delete from Transactions where platform=@platform and itemid=@itemid
insert into Transactions (platform,itemid,dt,count,price) values (@platform,@itemid,@dt,@count,@price)
[...]
insert into Transactions (platform,itemid,dt,count,price) values (@platform,@itemid,@dt,@count,@price)

The problem is, that this DELETE statement takes average 5 seconds. It's much too long.

The second solution I found is to use MERGE. I've created such Stored Procedure, wchich takes Table-valued parameter:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[sp_updateTransactions]
@Table dbo.tp_Transactions readonly,
@itemId bigint,
@platform char(1)
AS
BEGIN
MERGE Transactions AS TARGET
USING @Table AS SOURCE  
ON (    
TARGET.[itemId] = SOURCE.[itemId] AND
TARGET.[platform] = SOURCE.[platform] AND 
TARGET.[dt] = SOURCE.[dt] AND 
TARGET.[count] = SOURCE.[count] AND
TARGET.[price] = SOURCE.[price] ) 


WHEN NOT MATCHED BY TARGET THEN 
INSERT VALUES (SOURCE.[itemId], 
                SOURCE.[dt],
                SOURCE.[count],
                SOURCE.[price],
                SOURCE.[platform])

WHEN NOT MATCHED BY SOURCE AND TARGET.[itemId] = @itemId AND TARGET.[platform] = @platform THEN 
DELETE;

END

This procedure takes around 7 seconds with table with 70k records. So with 8M it would probably take few minutes. The bottleneck is "When not matched" - when I commented this line, this procedure runs on average 0,01 second.

So the question is: how to improve perfomance of the delete statement?

Delete is needed to make sure, that table doesn't contains transaction that as been removed in application. But it real scenario it happens really rarely, ane the true need of deleting records is less than 1 on 10000 transaction updates.

My theoretical workaround is to create additional column like "transactionDeleted bit" and use UPDATE instead of DELETE, ane then make table cleanup by batch job every X minutes or hours and Execute

delete from transactions where transactionDeleted=1

It should be faster, but I would need to update all SELECT statements in other parts of application, to use only transactionDeleted=0 records and so it also may afect application performance.

Do you know any better solution?

UPDATE: Current indexes:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX1] ON [dbo].[Transactions] 
(
[platform] ASC,
[ItemId] ASC
) WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF,   IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON, FILLFACTOR = 50) ON [PRIMARY]


CONSTRAINT [IX2] UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED 
(
[ItemId] DESC,
[count] ASC,
[dt] DESC,
[platform] ASC,
[price] ASC
) WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
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1  
"around 7 seconds with table with 70k records" - doesn't sound particularly fast. What indexes do you have? What sort of I/O subsystem? –  Mitch Wheat Oct 2 '11 at 13:50
    
suggest you add to your question... –  Mitch Wheat Oct 2 '11 at 13:55
    
Do you regularly update statistics? Rebuild indexes? If not, you should. –  Mitch Wheat Oct 2 '11 at 13:58
    
@MitchWheat I updated question with indexes. I/O subsystem - there is 2 ssd drives raid if it's what your asking. I rebuild indexes every night. –  adek Oct 2 '11 at 14:00
    
are you saying your data and log files are on the same drive? –  Mitch Wheat Oct 2 '11 at 14:04
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2 Answers

Using a BIT field for IsDeleted (or IsActive as many people do) is valid but it does require modifying all code plus creating a separate SQL Job to periodically come through and remove the "deleted" records. This might be the way to go but there is something less intrusive to try first.

I noticed in your set of 2 indexes that neither is CLUSTERED. Can I assume that the IDENTITY field is? You might consider making the [IX2] UNIQUE index the CLUSTERED one and changing the PK (again, I assume the IDENTITY field is a CLUSTERED PK) to be NONCLUSTERED. I would also reorder the IX2 fields to put [Platform] and [ItemID] first. Since your main operation is looking for [Platform] and [ItemID] as a set, physically ordering them this way might help. And since this index is unique, that is a good candidate for being CLUSTERED. It is certainly worth testing as this will impact all queries against the table.

Also, if changing the indexes as I have suggested helps, it still might be worth trying both ideas and hence doing the IsDeleted field as well to see if that increases performance even more.

EDIT: I forgot to mention, by making the IX2 index CLUSTERED and moving the [Platform] field to the top, you should get rid of the IX1 index.

EDIT2:

Just to be very clear, I am suggesting something like:

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED  INDEX [IX2]
(
[ItemId] DESC,
[platform] ASC,
[count] ASC,
[dt] DESC,
[price] ASC
)

And to be fair, changing which index is CLUSTERED could also negatively impact queries where JOINs are done on the [id] field which is why you need to test thoroughly. In the end you need to tune the system for your most frequent and/or expensive queries and might have to accept that some queries will be slower as a result but that might be worth this operation being much faster.

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Changing indexes as you wrote seems to greatly improve the performance and simplified execution plan a lot. I'm testing it and will write results soon :) –  adek Oct 2 '11 at 15:05
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See this http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3685141/how-to-....

would the update be the same cost as a delete? No. The update would be a much lighter operation, especially if you had an index on the PK (errrr, that's a guid, not an int). The point being that an update to a bit field is much less expensive. A (mass) delete would force a reshuffle of the data.

In light of this information, your idea to use a bit field is very valid.

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