Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does anyone know of a way to save the console.log output in Chrome to a file? Or how to copy the text out of the console?

Say you are running a few hours of functional tests and you've got thousands of lines of console.log output in Chrome. How do you save it or export it?

share|improve this question
1  

4 Answers 4

up vote 31 down vote accepted

I needed to do the same thing and this is the solution I found:

  1. Enable logging from the command line using the flags:

    --enable-logging --v=1

    This logs everything Chrome does internally, but it also logs all the console.log() messages as well. The log file is called chrome_debug.log and is located in the User Data Directory.

  2. Filter the log file you get for lines with 'CONSOLE(\d+)'.

share|improve this answer
    
seems it doesn't work on my mac os, there are internal logs but no Console.log... –  Nico May 22 '13 at 15:12
2  
This doesn't save the console.log info to the log file. In Windows 8. –  coderama May 24 '13 at 9:00
    
I can't get this to work for console.log() messages either - under win7. I do see the file created, but it's chrome specific logging, not console related. –  Justin Carroll Jun 14 '13 at 19:07
    
If I want to dump an object, it's axactly what's n the console, not the actual content of the object i.e: [5984:2912:0209/160123:INFO:CONSOLE(55)] "[object Object],[object Object]", source: (55) ... So I guess I have to "dump manually" the whole object? –  Olivier Pons Feb 9 '14 at 15:03
1  
@jaminroe it's parameters passed to chrome.exe. If you're on Windows, you can issue command %LOCALAPPDATA%\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe --enable-logging --v=1 in cmd.exe. –  cychoi Nov 16 '14 at 1:59

There is an open-source javascript plugin that does just that, but for any browser - debugout.js

Debugout.js records and save console.logs so your application can access them. Full disclosure, I wrote it. It formats different types appropriately, can handle nested objects and arrays, and can optionally put a timestamp next to each log. You can also toggle live-logging in one place, and without having to remove all your logging statements.

share|improve this answer
2  
Nice work dude, exactly what I needed. Thanks! –  Kimmax Aug 12 '14 at 23:12
    
For reference, though this looks like a great tool, it will not capture output from the browser, like when image loads fail, or other built-in console output, and it requires that you rewrite your log statements using a special syntax. –  Lukus Apr 13 at 21:28
    
@Lukus it certainly won't capture browser output (you would need a monkey patch to do that) but there is no special syntax needed. pass the same args as you would console.log –  inorganik Apr 13 at 21:47
    
@Inorganik I was searching for a way for selenium tests to capture console output, but it will be used for a testing service so we don't have control of the user's websites. I think your tool is cool, but it would require a user to rewrite their existing console.log statements as bugout.log, that's what I meant by special syntax. It appears so far that there is no cross-browser way to do it a this time. –  Lukus Apr 15 at 5:09
    
@Lukus you could try injecting a script that monkey-patches console... –  inorganik Apr 15 at 14:17

This may or may not be helpful but on Windows you can read the console log using Event Tracing for Windows

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms751538.aspx

Our integration tests are run in .NET so I use this method to add the console log to our test output. I've made a sample console project to demonstrate here: https://github.com/jkells/chrome-trace

--enable-logging --v=1 doesn't seem to work on the latest version of Chrome.

share|improve this answer

There is another open-source tool which allows you to save all console.log output in a file on your server - JS LogFlush (plug!).

JS LogFlush is an integrated JavaScript logging solution which include:

  • cross-browser UI-less replacement of console.log - on client side.
  • log storage system - on server side.

Demo

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.