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This isn't a big deal, but my OCD is acting up with the following problem in the database I'm creating. I'm not used to working with databases, but the data has to be stored somewhere...

Problem

I have two tables A and B.

My Two Tables

One of the datafields is common to both tables - segments. There's a finite number of segments, and I want to write queries that connect values from A to B through their segment values, very much asif the following table structure was used:

Should be three?

However, as you can see the table Segments is empty. There's nothing more I want to put into that table, rather than the ID to give other table as foreign keys. I want my tables to be as simple as possible, and therefore adding another one just seems wrong.

Note also that one of these tables (A, say) is actually master, in the sense that you should be able to put any value for segment into A, but B one should first check with A before inserting.

EDIT I tried one of the answers below:

create table A(
    id int primary key identity,
    segment int not null
)

create table B(
    id integer primary key identity,
    segment int not null
)

--Andomar's suggestion
alter table B add constraint FK_B_SegmentID
    foreign key (segment) references A(segment)

This produced the following error.

Maybe I was somehow unclear that segments is not-unique in A or B and can appear many times in both tables.

Msg 1776, Level 16, State 0, Line 11 There are no primary or candidate keys in the referenced table 'A' that match the referencing column list in the foreign key 'FK_B_SegmentID'. Msg 1750, Level 16, State 0, Line 11 Could not create constraint. See previous errors.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can ensure the segment exists in A with a foreign key:

alter table B add constraint FK_B_SegmentID
    foreign key (SegmentID) references A(SegmentID)

To avoid rows in B without a segment at all, make B.SegmentID not nullable:

alter table B alter column SegmentID int not null

There is no need to create a Segments table unless you want to associate extra data with a SegmentID.

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This sounds so convincing, and I was about to facepalm, but then I tried it out and it gave me lip. What am I doing wrong? Please see my edit. –  Gleno Oct 2 '11 at 16:24
    
@Gleno: A.segment has to have a UNIQUE constraint (or be a primary key) to allow a foreign key to reference it. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 2 '11 at 16:42
    
Yeah, what @Erwin said. Triggers are a one-way road to chaos, in my experience at least :) What I would do is only allow database manipulation through stored procedures that verify conditions before doing the inserts. That might be overkill though. –  Andomar Oct 2 '11 at 17:05
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You can create a foreign key relationship directly from B.SegmentID to A.SegmentID. There's no need for the extra table.

Update: If the SegmentIDs aren't unique in TableA, then you do need the extra table to store the segment IDs, and create foreign key relationships from both tables to this table. This however is not enough to enforce that all segment IDs in TableB also occur in TableA. You could instead use triggers.

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As Andomar and Mark Byers wrote, you don't have to create an extra table. You can also CASCADE UPDATEs or DELETEs on the master. Be very carefull with ON DELETE CASCADE though!

For queries use a JOIN:

SELECT *
  FROM A
  JOIN B ON a.SegmentID = b.SegmentID

Edit:

You have to add a UNIQUE constraint on segment_id in the "master" table to avoid duplicates there, or else the foreign key is not possible. Like this:

ALTER TABLE A ADD CONSTRAINT UNQ_A_SegmentID UNIQUE (SegmentID);
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I want to enforce integrity, so that the slave table can not supply values that are not in the master table, and maybe deletions should do something clever as well... –  Gleno Oct 2 '11 at 16:26
    
@Gleno: If you want to cascade DELETES on the master ... I added a link to my answer –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 2 '11 at 16:36
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If I've understood correctly, a given segment cannot be inserted into table B unless it has also been inserted into table A. In which case, table A should reference table Segments and table B should reference table A; it would be implicit that table B ultimately references table Segments (indirectly via table A) so an explicit reference is not required. This could be done using foreign keys (e.g. no triggers required).

Because table A has its own key I assume a given segment_ID can appear in table A more than once, therefore for B to be able to reference the segment_ID value in A then a superkey would need to be defined on the compound of A_ID and segment_ID. Here's a quick sketch:

CREATE TABLE Segments 
(
 segment_ID INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE
);

CREATE TABLE A 
(
 A_ID INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE, 
 segment_ID INTEGER NOT NULL
    REFERENCES Segments (segment_ID), 
 A_data INTEGER NOT NULL, 
 UNIQUE (segment_ID, A_ID)  -- superkey
);

CREATE TABLE B 
(
 B_ID INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE, 
 A_ID INTEGER NOT NULL, 
 segment_ID INTEGER NOT NULL, 
 FOREIGN KEY (segment_ID, A_ID)
    REFERENCES A (segment_ID, A_ID), 
 B_data INTEGER NOT NULL
);
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