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I have a list of numbers

l = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 0, 1]
[0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 2]
[1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1]]

For example , i have to search a pattern '2,1,1,2' , as we can see that is present in row 6 and 7 . in order to find that sequence i tried converting each list into str and tried to search the pattern , but for some reason the code isnt working.

import re
for i in l:
 if re.search('2,1,1,2' , str(i).strip('[').strip(']')): print " pattern found"

am i missing something in here ?

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Is that a string or bunch of lists? –  NullUserException Oct 2 '11 at 16:22
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/3313590/… for a very similar question. –  Petr Viktorin Oct 2 '11 at 16:27
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Converting your list in string is really not a good idea.

How about something like this:

def getsubidx(x, y):
    l1, l2 = len(x), len(y)
    for i in range(l1):
        if x[i:i+l2] == y:
            return i
share|improve this answer
    
actually the list l has many list as its elements. and converting into string allows me to use reg expressions. but if there is any computational efficiency in this method , then why not ! –  Rahul Oct 2 '11 at 16:39
    
+1, regex is really overkill for this problem. Simply looking to see if a sublist matches the query list should be way more efficient. –  MAK Oct 2 '11 at 17:03
    
well i m kinda very used to reg expressions . Still getting acquainted to pythonic way of coding. –  Rahul Oct 2 '11 at 17:54
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l = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0],
[0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 0, 1],
[0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 2],
[1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1]]
import re
for i in l:
 if re.search('2, 1, 1, 2' , str(i).strip('[').strip(']')): print " pattern found"

str(list) returns the string with spaces betwin the elements... so you should look for '2, 1, 1, 2' instead of 2,1,1,2

share|improve this answer
    
ohh silly mistake . i didnt see that initially. thanks –  Rahul Oct 2 '11 at 16:30
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Here is the same idea, without regex

data = [
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0],
     [0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 0, 1],
     [0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 2],
     [1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1],
]

pattern = '2112'

for item in data:
    line = ''
    for number in item:
        line += str(number)
    if pattern in line:
        print 'pattern found: %s' % item
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1  
Because strings are immutable, appending using += in this way is slow. It's better to accumulate the elements of the string in a list and join them at the end - ie replace the inner for loop with this: line = ''.join([str(i) for i in item]) –  joshayers Oct 2 '11 at 21:42
    
you're right, thanks to point this out. –  Nicolas Paris Oct 2 '11 at 22:36
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I suggest you to use the Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm. I suppose you are implicitly assuming that your pattern is present in the list just one time, or you are just interested in knowing if it's in or not.

If you want the list of each first element which starts the sequence, then you can use KMP. Think about it as a sort of string.find() for lists.

I hope this will help.

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