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I would like to create an AJAX-based search for my webpage. So far I am able to send the form data and make the appropriate call to my Django model. What I am having a hard time with is just sending the Queryset back and having it rendered using the Django templating system. Your help/advice is greatly appreciated.

Here is the code I am working with.

views.py

if request.is_ajax():
    if request.method == 'POST':
        format = 'json'
        mimetype = 'application/json'
        try:
            q = request.POST['obj']
            o = Object.objects.filter(name__icontains=q)
            return render_to_response( 'project_view_objects.html', {'username': request.user.username, 'results':o})

view.html

<script>
    $(document).ready(function(){

    $("#search_form").submit(function(event)
    {
        event.preventDefault();


        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: "/objects/search/",
            data: $(this).serialize(),
            processData: false,
            dataType: "json"
            });
    });});
</script>

<article>
    <blockquote>
        <form class="create_form" id="search_form">
            <p>
                <input id="objectSearchNameInput" type="text" name="obj" value="Object name">
                <input type="submit" value="search objects">
            </p>
        </form>
    </blockquote>
</article>
<br />

{% if results %}
<blockquote>
    <aside class="column">
        {% for object in results %}
            <b><a href="#" class="extra-text-special">{{ object.name }}</a></b><br />
        {% endfor %}
    </aside>
    <aside class="column">
        {% for object in results %}
            <font class="extra-text-nospecial">{{ object.created_when }}</font><br />
        {% endfor %}
    </aside>
</blockquote>
{% else %}
    <p>haha</p>
{% endif %}

At the moment, all I see displayed on the page is 'haha'.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The thing you're missing is that the template has already been rendered by the time the AJAX is fired - as of course it must be, because templates are server-side and javascript is client-side.

So the thing to do is to get your Ajax views not to return JSON, but rendered templates, which your Javascript callback then inserts into the template.

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Can you give a code example? –  Jesus Noland Oct 3 '11 at 4:24
    
Thank you for your advice. I used render_to_string and then sent the rendered html back as json in the format {'html':html} then you can access it by data.html if the parameter name for your success function is called data. –  Jesus Noland Oct 4 '11 at 8:44

My solution was using Dajax, creating small fragment templates for for instance rendering a list. Then render them in the Dajax functions, and write them in the document with the appropriate javascript calls. You can see an example on (and actually all the documentation of dajax is quite good): http://www.dajaxproject.com/pagination/

Another solution which I recently found (but have not tried myself) is: http://www.jperla.com/blog/post/write-bug-free-javascript-with-pebbles

Lastly you might go totally the other way and use Backbone.js, but in that way you (more or less) end up with the same problem, how to share backbone templates with django templates (I think you should be able to write a template tag, which dependant on the 'mode' writes either a value, or a backbone template tag, thus allowing you to reuse your templates)

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Thanks I am really looking for a solution using Django templates the way they're supposed to be used. –  Jesus Noland Oct 2 '11 at 18:01
    
Then I would use one of the first two solutions. –  markijbema Oct 2 '11 at 18:02
    
Any good tutorials using Dajax? –  Jesus Noland Oct 3 '11 at 4:25
    
dajaxproject.com/pagination (also editted it to the answer) –  markijbema Oct 3 '11 at 5:02

this is the final answer

python

if request.is_ajax():
    if request.method == 'POST':
        format = 'json'
        mimetype = 'application/json'
        try:
            q = request.POST['obj']
            #message = {"object_name": "hey, you made it"}
            o = Object.objects.filter(name__icontains=q)
        except:
            message = {"object_name": "didn't make it"}
        #m = str(q['id'])
        #json = simplejson.dumps(message)
        #data = serializers.serialize(format, o)
        #return HttpResponse(data, mimetype)

        html = render_to_string( 'results.html', { 'username': request.user.username, 'objects': o } )
        res = {'html': html}
        return HttpResponse( simplejson.dumps(res), mimetype )

html

<script>
    $(document).ready(function(){

    $("#search_form").submit(function(event)
    {
        event.preventDefault();

        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: "/objects/search/",
            data: $(this).serialize(),
            processData: false,
            dataType: "json",
            success: function( data ){
                    $( '#results' ).html( data.html );
                }
            });
    });});
</script>

. . .

<article>
    <blockquote>
        <form class="create_form" id="search_form">
            <p>
                <input id="objectSearchNameInput" type="text" name="obj" value="Object name">
                <input type="submit" value="search objects">
            </p>
        </form>
    </blockquote>
</article>
<br />
<aside id="results">
</aside>
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