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Though I'm trying to understand why "this" is needed, I'm very confused about its purpose. For instance, I coded the following:

public static void main (String args[])
{
    SandboxClass1 temp = new SandboxClass1(1,2,3);  
    System.out.println(temp.getX());
    System.out.println(temp.getY());
    System.out.println(temp.getZ());

    System.out.println("----------------------------");

    SandboxClass1 temp2 = new SandboxClass1(4,5,6);
    System.out.println(temp2.getX());
    System.out.println(temp2.getY());
    System.out.println(temp2.getZ());
}

public class SandboxClass1 
{

private int x = 1;
private int y = 1;
private int z = 0;

public SandboxClass1(int x, int y, int zz)
{
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    z = zz;
}

public int getX()
{
    return(this.x);
}

public int getY()
{
    return(this.y);
}

public int getZ()
{
    return(this.z);
}

}

Why do I need to code "this.z = zz"
when I could just as well write, "z = zz"?

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2  
for z and zz you shouldn't need this. –  Daniel A. White Oct 2 '11 at 18:15
1  
Using this in places where it is not mandatory, like in your getters, is just a matter of coding style. –  Aurélien Ribon Oct 2 '11 at 18:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your SandboxClass1 constructor, you have two pairs of variables each called x and y. There's the x and y declared on the object itself ("private int x = 1"), and the separate x and y that are parameters to the constructor ("int x").

The local (parameter) variable shadows the class variable. So if in the constructor you just did

x = x;

the assignment would have no effect.

The keyword this is a reference to the object that the method/constructor was called on. In the statement

this.x = x;

you're using it to assign to the other x at class level. By qualifying the name, you can tell them apart.

It's not necessary to use this with the z/zz assignment because they have different names.

It's also not necessary in the getX/Y/Z methods because there are no local variables in those methods shadowing the relevant class variables. It does no harm though.

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1  
Nothing in the example is at the "class" level; that is, none of the example variables are class variables. Those in the example are instance variables, not class variables. –  Fly Oct 3 '11 at 3:35

You don't, in this case. It's only required when you must eliminate ambiguity, like when parameters and instance variables share a name.

Some people prefer to use "this" to remove conceptual ambiguity and explicitly state that the code references an instance variable.

(On a side note, the parentheses around the return values are unnecessary and a bit noisy, IMO.)

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In the SandboxClass1 constructor two of the parameters (x and y) hide class variables because they are the same name. If you want to assign the class variable x to any value while in the code>SandboxClass1 constructor, you must address it using this.x to tell the compiler that "I want to assign the class scope variable named x, and not the method scope variable named x". The same applies to y.

Since the parameter z does not hide the class scope variable named zz you do not need to tell the compiler the scope of the zz variable, the class scope zz is the only recognized variable so that is the one that gets assigned.

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It has the same effect. this is needed if there is a local variable which overrides a field of the class; then you get the local variable and not the class field.

An additional advantage you can indicate the variables better. If there is a this; it's a field; local variable otherwise.

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the keyword this is used to refer to an attribute that is in the class. The keyword this was created to distinguish between class attributes and method parameters. like this:

public class human
{
    public void setName(String name)
    {
        // the first name is a reference to the class attribute name
        this.name = name;
        // the second name is a reference to the method parameter name
    }

    // definition of the class attribute name
    private String name;
}

when you use the keyword this it refers to the name variable inside the class heres an example where you don't need to use this:

public class Human
{
    public void setName(String myName)
    {
        name = myName
    }

    private String name;
}

see now there is only 1 variable named name and there is only one variable named myName. In the other example there was 2 variables named name. One was a class attribute and one was a method parameter.

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'this' operator just refines that property/field belongs to class you're working in. It's useful whe you have, for example, two variables with the same name:

this.zz = zz;
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Unlike, say, Objective-C, "this" is optional when the method or variable is local, and there is no other conflicting use of the same name.

It comes in handy in conflicting-name cases, though, such as in methods that set instance variables such as void setOnionCount(int onionCount) where you would like to use "onionCount" for the formal parameter but still have "onionCount" as the instance variable name. In such a case you can do this.onionCount = onionCount; and everyone is happy (except, I suppose, those in the Peanut Gallery who'll object to this technique).

"this" is also absolutely necessary in cases where you need to pass a reference to the current object to some other class, of course.

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hey this is use to provide reference of invoking object. That i.e say suppose ur class is box then if you want to provide it's object then you can provide it within the class box using this keyword.

class Box {
    int x;
    public Box(int x){
        this.x = x;
    }
}

here in this case if your object is ob (i.e Box ob = new Box(1)) then the reference it will be passed to the itself. Note: you cannot use this keyword outside of the class. If you use so then it will give reference of another class. for complete detail on this keyword refer following link http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/thiskey.html

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