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I want to store notes, bookmarks, videos and images that belong to a user:

The simplified user table is as follows:

user: id, email, password_hash

A note contains a title and content, whereas a bookmark contains a title and a url

note: id, title, content, (user_id)
bookmark: id, title, uri
video: id, title, uri
images: id, title, uri

I could create a table for all these, however If I wanted to add something else, for example tasks, I would have to create another table for this. How do you suggest I design the tables?

Is mysql the best db for this, Or would something like mongodb be better?

share|improve this question
    
Could you have one table with id, title, content and user_id, with content as a generic field? Then add another field specifying the type of content that row defines. –  Bojangles Oct 2 '11 at 19:55
    
What is the scope of uniqueness of title - globally unique, unique per content type, unique per user or unique per combination of user and content type? Will there be any fields other than url in content? Are you using InnoDB (so clustering is an issue)? Do you need ability to specify new content types without changing the database model? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Oct 3 '11 at 15:39
    
a) unique per content type, b) timestamp, deleted (bool) c) No I'm not using InnoDB. –  john mossel Oct 3 '11 at 17:18
    
@johnmossel Will there ever be different fields for different types of content? Also, can a content be shared among users (e.g. two users having same image)? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Oct 3 '11 at 21:35
    
No users cannot share. Content is either a URI or text. –  john mossel Oct 29 '11 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

As JamWaffles suggests you could have one table for content and one for content types, i.e.:

content: id, title, uri, content_type_id, user_id
content_type: id, name

EDIT: The content table could look like this:

-------------------------------------------------------------
| id |   title   |     uri      | content_type_id | user_id |
-------------------------------------------------------------
| 1  | 'My note' | '/note?id=1' |        4        |    56   |
-------------------------------------------------------------

And the content type table:

---------------
| id |  name  |
---------------
| 4  | 'note' |
---------------

I haven't actually used MongoDB but I guess you could use the following structure:

{
  "id": "...",
  "email": "...",
  "password_hash": "...",
  "notes": {
    "id": "...",
    "title": "...",
    "uri": "..."
  }
  "bookmarks": {
     ...
  }
}

MongoDB like other NoSQL databases have their advantages as well as disadvantages. You would have to evaluate your specific needs in order to determine which better suite yours. Personally I don't see why you couldn't use mysql for your proprosed database structure.

I hope this helps,
Per Flitig
Netlight Consulting

share|improve this answer
    
What happens to the note content then? Shall I create a separate table for that? –  john mossel Oct 2 '11 at 20:59
    
In the mysql case you'd have the notes in the table content. An example row in content could be {123, 'My note', '/note?id=1', 4, 56} with the corresponding row in content_type, {4, 'note'} –  flitig Oct 2 '11 at 21:57

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