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This program is printing the directories at the root level

Directory_1
Directory_2

but I want to be able to print the directories within them too

Directory_1
   Directory_1_2
   Directory_1_3
Directory_2
   Directory 2_1
      Directory_2_1_1
Directory_4

I am trying to do it recursively but I am finding it hard to pass the Directory_1 as a root so it gets evaluated.. What am i missing?

Here is my output

..
.
Directory_1
Directory_2
Failed to open directory: No such file or directory

Code

#include <dirent.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

char *arg_temp;

int printDepthFirst(char *arg_tmp);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

   if (argc != 2) {
      fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s directory_name\n", argv[0]);
      return 1; 
   }  


  arg_temp = argv[1]; 

  printDepthFirst(arg_temp);

}

int printDepthFirst(char *arg_tmp)
{

   struct dirent *direntp;
   DIR *dirp;

   if ((dirp = opendir(arg_tmp)) == NULL) {
      perror ("Failed to open directory");
      return 1;
   }  


   while ((direntp = readdir(dirp)) != NULL)
  {
   printf("%s\n", direntp->d_name);
   arg_tmp = direntp->d_name;
  }    
   printDepthFirst(arg_tmp);

  while ((closedir(dirp) == -1) && (errno == EINTR)) ;
     return 0;

}

Now, I know some people get irritated when asking questions that they think I am expecting them to code this, you dont need to, if you can tell me theoretically what i need to do.. I will research it although if its a small programmatically fix and you can post that I would really appreaciate it.. but if not.. I would also love to hear about what needs to be done in words..

Thank you

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3  
People get irritated because you're not spending much time trying to resolve things yourself. You're getting no such directory, so what did you do to debug this? Did you print out the name of the directory about to be open? Does it correspond to a name in your current directory? If not, what do you think you could do to make it work? (And there are lots of directory traversal examples at your disposal on the web.) –  Mat Oct 2 '11 at 20:58
    
hmm i have spent quite a while, your assumptions are incorrect.. you can not judge just on the fly without knowing.. i have tried different things.. and yes i tried all the above and got errors as mentioned on my post –  user975582 Oct 2 '11 at 21:22
    
You need to spend more time thinking about your code, and learning to debug it. The code you post does not have a single "debug" printout, so it's not clear at all that you understand what is going on. If you print things out as the code runs, or use a debugger, you'll get a better feel of how the code actually works, and you'll understand what you need to do to fix it. But you really need to think about your code, and help yourself by taking small steps with as much debugging info as possible at every step. –  Mat Oct 2 '11 at 21:26
    
Ok thank you for the advise –  user975582 Oct 2 '11 at 21:27
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well this should help:

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 500
#include <ftw.h>
#include <stdio.h>

static int display_info(const char *fpath, const struct stat *sb,
             int tflag, struct FTW *ftwbuf)
{
    switch(tflag)
    {
        case FTW_D:
        case FTW_DP: puts(fpath); break;
    }
    return 0; /* To tell nftw() to continue */
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if (argc != 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s directory_name\n", argv[0]);
        return 1; 
    }  

    int flags = FTW_DEPTH | FTW_MOUNT | FTW_PHYS;

    if (nftw(argv[1], display_info, 20, flags) == -1)
    {
        perror("nftw");
        return 255;
    }

    return 0;
}
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wow this works really nice –  user975582 Oct 2 '11 at 21:20
    
@user975582: point in case: re-use code, don't reinvent the wheel :) –  sehe Oct 2 '11 at 21:25
    
I didn't know about nftw(), thanks :) –  Septagram Oct 2 '11 at 21:29
    
One question Sehe, If i wanted to print a filename .. where would I add that? –  user975582 Oct 2 '11 at 21:57
    
@user975582: per-use the man page: it shows the typeflags for files/symlinks and what else is available ("FTW_F fpath is a regular file") –  sehe Oct 2 '11 at 22:03
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Have a look at what fields struct dirent contains.

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The string dirent::d_name is a name of a directory, not it's full path. So, if your directory "C:\Alpha" contains directory "C:\Alpha\Beta", d_name would only contatin "Beta", not "C:\Alpha\Beta". You will have to assemble the full path yourself - appending slash/backslash to your arg_tmp and then appending new directory name, like this:

while ((direntp = readdir (dirp)) != NULL)
{
   char *dirname = direntp->d_name;

   // Only work with directories and avoid recursion on "." and "..":
   if (direntp->d_type != DT_DIR || !strcmp (dirname, ".") || !strcmp (dirname, "..")) continue;

   // Assemble full directory path:
   char current [strlen (arg_tmp) + 2 + strlen (dirname)];
   strcpy (current, arg_tmp);
   strcat (current, "\\"); // Replace "\\" with "/" on *nix systems
   strcat (current, dirname);

   // Show it and continue:
   printf ("%s\n", current);
   printDepthFirst (current);
}

Also, you should call recursively inside the loop, not outside.

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Sounds good, what library or header should i import to use strcpy, strcat? –  user975582 Oct 2 '11 at 21:17
    
@user975582: #include <string.h> –  Septagram Oct 2 '11 at 21:22
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Inside your while loop inside printDepthFirst you might need something like:

if(direntp->d_type == DT_DIR)
    printDepthFirst(directp->d_name);

You might perhaps have to worry about .. directories too.

Alternatively, I've found boost::filesystem to work quite well.

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