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I'm still new to C#. Currently using .NET 3.5. I'm writing an online game, and my game engine needs to handle player requested unit movement. The units will move at different speeds and can have different destinations, so the actual time that the unit arrives (and the command completes) will differ widely.

My strategy is that the model will calculate the next move along a given path, and then queue a worker to execute around the same time the unit would be arriving at the location. The worker will update the unit, notify players, queue the next step, etc.

One of my biggest stumbling blocks was writing a worker thread that would conditionally execute a task. In the past my worker threads have just tried to run each task, in order, as quickly as possible. The other challenge is that unit moves might get queued that have earlier start times than any other task in the queue, so obviously, they would need to get moved to the front of the line.

This is what I have figured out so far, it works but it has some limitations, namely its 100ms sleep limits my command response time. Is there a pattern for what i'm trying to do, or am I missing something obvious?

Thank you!

public class ScheduledTaskWorker
{
    List<ScheduledTask> Tasks = new List<ScheduledTask>();

    public void AddTask(ScheduledTask task)
    {
        lock (Tasks)
        {
            Tasks.Add(task);
            Tasks.Sort();
        }
    }

    private void RemoveTask(ScheduledTask task)
    {
        lock (Tasks)
        {
            Tasks.Remove(task);
        }
    }

    private ScheduledTask[] CopyTasks()
    {
        lock (Tasks)
        {
            return Tasks.ToArray();
        }
    }


    public void DoWork()
    {
        while (!StopWorking)
        {
            ScheduledTask[] safeCopy = CopyTasks();

            foreach (ScheduledTask task in safeCopy)
            {
                if (task.ExecutionTime > DateTime.Now) 
                    break;

                if (ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(ThreadPoolCallBack), task))
                    RemoveTask(task);
                else
                {
                    // if work item couldn't be queued, stop queuing and sleep for a bit
                    break;
                }
            }

            // sleep for 100 msec so we don't hog the CPU. 
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
        }
    }

    static void ThreadPoolCallBack(Object stateInfo)
    {
        ScheduledTask task = stateInfo as ScheduledTask;
        task.Execute();
    }

    public void RequestStop()
    {
        StopWorking = true;
    }

    private volatile bool StopWorking;
}

And the task itself...

public class ScheduledTask : IComparable
{
    Action<Item> Work;
    public DateTime ExecutionTime;
    Item TheItem;

    public ScheduledTask(Item item, Action<Item> work, DateTime executionTime)
    {
        Work = work;
        TheItem = item;
        ExecutionTime = executionTime;
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        Work(TheItem);
    }

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        ScheduledTask p2 = obj as ScheduledTask;
        return ExecutionTime.CompareTo(p2.ExecutionTime);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        ScheduledTask p2 = obj as ScheduledTask;
        return ExecutionTime.Equals(p2.ExecutionTime);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return ExecutionTime.GetHashCode();
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not disagreeing with Chris, his answer is probably more appropriate to your underlying problem.

However, to answer your specific question, you could use something equivalent to Java's DelayQueue, which looks to have been ported to C# here: http://code.google.com/p/netconcurrent/source/browse/trunk/src/Spring/Spring.Threading/Threading/Collections/Generic/DelayQueue.cs?spec=svn16&r=16

Your Task class would implement IDelayed then you could either have a single thread calling Take (which blocks while there are no items ready) and executing task, or pass them off to ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm wishing I had studied Java more, I could have saved several hours of hard thinking to come up with what I made. That class comes pretty damn close. –  Ivan Bohannon Oct 3 '11 at 13:52
    
Could you explain explicitly how should I use that class? Now I have a java code that I am trying to convert to C#. There, coder uses DelayQueue class. How should I implement that class now in C#? –  MeM Feb 18 '14 at 14:57
    
@MeM, you should probably raise another question with your specific issues. The C# version of DelayQueue is almost identical to the Java version so it can be used in an almost identical manner that your existing Java code is using it. –  SimonC Feb 20 '14 at 8:14

That sounds dangerously brittle. Without knowing more about your game and its circumstances, it sounds like you could potentially drown the computer in new threads just by moving a lot of units around and having them do long-running tasks. If this is server-side code and any number of players could be using this at once, that almost guarantees issues with too many threads. Additionally, there are timing problems. Complex code, bad estimating, delays in starting a given thread (which will happen with the ThreadPool) or a slowdown from a lot of threads executing simultaneously will all potentially delay the time when your task is actually executed.

As far as I know, the majority of games are single-threaded. This is to cut down on these issues, as well as get everything more in sync. If actions happen on separate threads, they may receive unfair prioritization and run unpredictably, thereby making the game unfair. Generally, a single game loop goes through all of the actions and performs them in a time-based fashion (i.e. Unit Bob can move 1 square per second and his sprite animates at 15 frames per second). For example, drawing images/animating, moving units, performing collision detection and running tasks would all potentially happen each time through the loop. This eliminates timing issues as well, because everything will get the same priority (regardless of what they're doing or how fast they move). This also means that the unit will know the instant that it arrives at its destination and can execute whatever task it's supposed to do, a little bit at a time each iteration.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Chris, great suggestions, yes it server side code. You've given me a lot to consider. I find it hard to believe that a multiplayer game engine would be single threaded as you mentioned. I can believe this for the client side. –  Ivan Bohannon Oct 3 '11 at 11:27
    
I spun execution of the ready commands off to the thread pool because I didn't want them to slow down other ready commands. –  Ivan Bohannon Oct 3 '11 at 13:54
    
It very well could be multi-threaded, it really depends on what work you are doing in parallel. If you're doing work for individual players, that may affect the gameplay itself and should be avoided. If you're either doing work that doesn't affect gameplay or you're waiting until all threads are finished before using the result, that's more easily done in parallel. There may be tradeoffs with performance that way, though. –  Chris Hannon Oct 3 '11 at 15:31
    
As far as the work being done, think of it as a division of responsibilities. What does the server actually care about knowing or handling? It has to 1) know where each player's pieces are and 2) know what they are currently doing so it can show this to the other player (and possibly do other things as well, like interaction between player's units). Under that model, though, all the server knows is that the client just said "Hey, I moved this unit two spaces to the right". That's not a whole lot to process and communicate to other players, and hardly necessary to handle with more threads. –  Chris Hannon Oct 3 '11 at 15:36
    
It also depends on the game, though. Your game circumstances may have different requirements that necessitate this, so I'm speaking in generalities here. –  Chris Hannon Oct 3 '11 at 15:37

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