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I' started learning JavaScript recently and I'm stuck up with this concept of 'Functions that return functions'. I'm referring the book 'Object Oriented Javascript' by Stoyan Stefanov. I have prior programming experience in Java, C and C++ and also 2 years of work experience applying my knowledge on the same.

Snippet One:

function a() {

    alert('A!');

    function b(){
        alert('B!'); 
    }

    return b();
}

var s = a();
alert('break');
s();

Output:

A!
B!
break

Snippet Two

function a() {

    alert('A!');

    function b(){
        alert('B!'); 
    }

    return b;
}

var s = a();
alert('break');
s();

Output:

A!
break
B!

Can someone please tell me the difference between returning b and b() in the above snippets? I tried searching for stuff on google but couldn't get any worthy links. I'd be glad if someone also provided me some links explaining the concept. Thanks and Regards.

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7 Answers 7

Assigning a variable to a function (without the parenthesis) copies the reference to the function. Putting the parenthesis at the end of a function name, calls the function, returning the functions return value.

Demo

function a() {
    alert('A');
}
//alerts 'A', returns undefined

function b() {
    alert('B');
    return a;
}
//alerts 'B', returns function a

function c() {
    alert('C');
    return a();
}
//alerts 'C', alerts 'A', returns undefined

alert("Function 'a' returns " + a());
alert("Function 'b' returns " + b());
alert("Function 'c' returns " + c());

In your example, you are also defining functions within a function. Such as:

function d() {
    function e() {
        alert('E');
    }
    return e;
}
d()();
//alerts 'E'

The function is still callable. It still exists. This is used in JavaScript all the time. Functions can be passed around just like other values. Consider the following:

function counter() {
    var count = 0;
    return function() {
        alert(count++);
    }
}
var count = counter();
count();
count();
count();

The function count can keep the variables that were defined outside of it. This is called a closure. It's also used a lot in JavaScript.

share|improve this answer
    
Great Example. Thanks for Sharing! Regards. –  Cafecorridor Oct 2 '11 at 23:51
    
+1 for this detailed version :-) –  Abdo Oct 3 '11 at 0:08
    
This is my first question. I'm sure I'll learn the dynamics of voting sooner than Javascript :) :) –  Cafecorridor Oct 3 '11 at 0:09
3  
+1 Thanks for d()(); –  cjmling Jan 10 '13 at 7:13
2  
I was confused by the d()(); at first but then realized that the first () calls d and the second () calls d's return value, which is e. –  skud Mar 13 at 18:47

Returning the function name without () returns a reference to the function, which can be assigned as you've done with var s = a(). s now contains a reference to the function b(), and calling s() is functionally equivalent to calling b().

// Return a reference to the function b().
// In your example, the reference is assigned to var s
return b;

Calling the function with () in a return statement executes the function, and returns whatever value was returned by the function. It is similar to calling var x = b();, but instead of assigning the return value of b() you are returning it from the calling function a(). If the function b() itself does not return a value, the call returns undefined after whatever other work is done by b().

// Execute function b() and return its value
return b();
// If b() has no return value, this is equivalent to calling b(), followed by
// return undefined;
share|improve this answer
    
Of all the answers, I liked your answer more due to its simplicity. –  Anar Khalilov Oct 25 '13 at 7:50

return b(); calls the function b(), and returns its result.

return b; returns a reference to the function b, which you can store in a variable to call later.

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1  
+1 for simple answer. –  kzh Oct 2 '11 at 23:53

Returning b is returning a function object. In Javascript, functions are just objects, like any other object. If you find that not helpful, just replace the word "object" with "thing". You can return any object from a function. You can return a true/false value. An integer (1,2,3,4...). You can return a string. You can return a complex object with multiple properties. And you can return a function. a function is just a thing.

In your case, returning b returns the thing, the thing is a callable function. Returning b() returns the value returned by the callable function.

Consider this code:

function b() {
   return 42;
}

Using the above definition, return b(); returns the value 42. On the other hand return b; returns a function, that itself returns the value of 42. They are two different things.

share|improve this answer
    
it should return 42 ;) –  c69 Oct 3 '11 at 8:36
    
d'oh! what was I thinking? –  Cheeso Oct 3 '11 at 12:15

When you return b, it is just a reference to function b, but not being executed at this time.

When you return b(), you're executing the function and returning its value.

Try alerting typeof(s) in your examples. Snippet b will give you 'function'. What will snippet a give you?

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First one gives 'undefined'. Does it mean that return b() is completely useless? Also, in the second snippet, function b is private. How then are we able to access the reference outside the function? Please provide me a link which explains this concept clearly if possible. Thanks! –  Cafecorridor Oct 2 '11 at 23:32
    
I got the answer to the first one. return 1+2 in function b() and the typeof shows number. Thanks. –  Cafecorridor Oct 2 '11 at 23:35
    
Glad you figured it out! As for the private function: It's not really private in the second example since you already returned it. In fact, it gets assigned to s. Try return this instead of return b though … You'll be able to do s.b() then ;) –  vzwick Oct 2 '11 at 23:39
    
I'll try it out for sure. Haven't reached the this concept in Javascript yet. Maybe in a couple of days. Thanks! :) –  Cafecorridor Oct 2 '11 at 23:54
    
function a(){ alert("A!"); function b(){ alert("B!"); } return b; } var s = a(); delete a; s(); ----end---- Is the concept of reference in Javascript same as in Java? Here I've deleted the function a() and yet a call to s() executes b(). So can i say that s contains a copy of b and is not pointing to b() defined in a() ? –  Cafecorridor Oct 3 '11 at 8:46

Create a variable:

var thing1 = undefined;

Declare a Function:

function something1 () {
    return "Hi there, I'm number 1!";
}

Alert the value of thing1 (our first variable):

alert(thing1); // Outputs: "undefined".

Now, if we wanted thing1 to be a reference to the function something1, meaning it would be the same thing as our created function, we would do:

thing1 = something1;

However, if we wanted the return value of the function then we must assign it the return value of the executed function. You execute the function by using parenthesis:

thing1 = something1(); // Value of thing1: "Hi there, I'm number 1!" 
share|improve this answer

Imagine the function as a type, like an int. You can return ints in a function. You can return functions too, they are object of type "function".

Now the syntax problem: because functions returns values, how can you return a function and not it's returning value?

by omitting brackets! Because without brackets, the function won't be executed! So:

return b;

Will return the "function" (imagine it like if you are returning a number), while:

return b();

First executes the function then return the value obtained by executing it, it's a big difference!

share|improve this answer
    
In the second snippet, function b is private. How then are we able to access the reference outside the function? Are there any rules governing the same? –  Cafecorridor Oct 2 '11 at 23:40
    
Objects in JavaScript (this includes functions) are no longer private if you share them. –  kzh Oct 3 '11 at 0:13
    
@Cafecorridor: If the private function is returned by something (a public function) or is assigned to a public variable (well, an application-accessible variable), you can easily do yourvariable();, otherwise assign the function returned to a variable and do again yourvariable(); –  Fire-Dragon-DoL Oct 3 '11 at 3:56

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