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I am using an old exam as a study guide and one of the questions is to use pthreads to fill in the following code:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int a;
    int b;
    } local_data;

void *foo(void *arg);

int main() {
    int a = 12;
    int b = 9;
    pthread_t tid;
    pthread_attr_t attr;

    local_data local;
    local.a = a;
    local.b = b;

    pthread_attr_init(&attr);

    /* block of code we are supposed to fill in (my attempt at filling it in)
    pthread_create(&tid, &attr, foo, &local);
    pthread_join(tid, NULL);
    */

    b = b - 5;
    printf("program exit. a = %d, b = %d\n", a, b);

    return 0;
}

void *foo(void *arg) {
     int a, b;
     local_data *local = (local_data*)arg;

    /* block of code we are supposed to fill in (my attempt at filling it in)
    a = local->a;
    b = local->b;
    a++;
    */

    printf("program exit. a = %d, b = %d\n", a, b);
    pthread_exit(0);
}

What we are supposed to do is make our pthreads mimic this code:

int main() {
    int a = 12;
    int b = 9;
    int fid = fork();

    if (fid == 0) {
        a++;
    }
    else {
        wait(NULL);
        b = b - 5;
    }

    printf("program exit. a = %d, b = %d\n", a, b);
    return 0;
}

I've been really lost on this section and I am sure I do not understand it as well as I should (or at all). Would appreciate any answers to help me grasp the concept.

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1  
local_data *local is a pointer declaration, so local.a should be local->a instead. –  K-ballo Oct 3 '11 at 3:54
    
@K-ballo Thanks for catching that! –  raphnguyen Oct 3 '11 at 3:56
2  
You've edited the original post to include @Brendan's answer. Are you still having issues? If so, you should add more information to help us figure out what's wrong. If not, you should accept Brendan's answer. –  jswolf19 Oct 3 '11 at 13:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This line is wrong:

pthread_create(&tid, &attr, foo(local), NULL);

pthread_create's signature is:

int pthread_create(pthread_t *thread, const pthread_attr_t *attr,
    void *(*start_routine)(void*), void *arg);

The third argument is a function and the last argument is it's argument, so instead of calling the function (foo(local)), pass the function and the argument separately:

pthread_create(&tid, &attr, foo, &local);
share|improve this answer
1  
b also needs to be initialized in the thread function. –  jswolf19 Oct 3 '11 at 4:00
    
@Brendan Thanks! I didn't quite understand the syntax. This clears it up a bit. –  raphnguyen Oct 3 '11 at 4:00
    
@jswolf19 Thanks for catching that. –  raphnguyen Oct 3 '11 at 4:01
    
@jswolf19 - This is the part that stood out to me. If there's more, I'd suggest making your own answer (so you can get the credit). –  Brendan Long Oct 3 '11 at 4:02
    
@Brendan, no, this is the major part. I imagine that b being uninitialized is pretty easy to find once you get to the point of passing the correct arguments to pthread_create. –  jswolf19 Oct 3 '11 at 13:05

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