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I have an entity with a binary datatype and a corresponding varbinary(max) in sql server. EF creates this:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Attachments] (
    [Id] int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [FileName] nvarchar(255) NOT NULL,
    [Attachment] varbinary(max) NOT NULL
);

When I try to fire savechanges from entity framework, I get an error: "Cannot create a row of size 8061 which is greater than the allowable maximum row size of 8060".

I understand the error, there's plenty of that on Google but I don't understand why I'm getting it. Shouldn't this be managed by entity framework / sql server?

Richard

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1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The only way I can see you getting this error with that table definition is if you have previously had a large fixed width column that has since been dropped.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Attachments] (
    [Id] int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [FileName] nvarchar(255) NOT NULL,
    [Attachment] varbinary(max) NOT NULL,
    Filler char(8000),
    Filler2 char(49)
);

ALTER TABLE  [dbo].[Attachments] DROP COLUMN Filler,Filler2

INSERT INTO [dbo].[Attachments]
([FileName],[Attachment])
VALUES
('Foo',0x010203)

Which Gives

Msg 511, Level 16, State 1, Line 12 Cannot create a row of size 8075 which is greater than the allowable maximum row size of 8060.

If this is the case then try rebuilding the table

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Attachments] REBUILD 
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1  
Really well done, that man :) I'd had a similar thought but my trawls across Google led me to try DBCC CLEANTABLE. Your suggestion was spot on. Many thanks! –  Richard Oct 3 '11 at 22:21
    
In-fact, its good practice to rebuild the table after structure is changed. It increases performance greatly! –  Tejasvi Hegde Jul 5 '14 at 14:46

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