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I have a C/C++ programming background, and while casually learning Javascript through the @3C webpages on JS, I found this piece of code -

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function validateForm()
{
var x=document.forms["myForm"]["email"].value;
var atpos=x.indexOf("@");
var dotpos=x.lastIndexOf(".");
if (atpos<1 || dotpos<atpos+2 || dotpos+2>=x.length)
  {
  alert("Not a valid e-mail address");
  return false;
  }
}
</script>
</head>

<body>
<form name="myForm" action="demo_form.asp" onsubmit="return validateForm();" method="post">
Email: <input type="text" name="email">
<input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>
</body>

Well, I do not know if I have missed out any of their previous lessons; am confused over the "return" used in the line -

<form name="myForm" action="demo_form.asp" onsubmit="return validateForm();" method="post">

My question - Since the "onsubmit" in the above line on calling the function "validateForm()" will anyways be looking for a return value of true/false, what is the significance of this explicit return keyword? I see that on deleting the return keyword, and running the above code (as - onsubmit = "validateForm();" ) works, but even if an error in input is there the form ultimately gets submitted after displaying the warning message.

Could you please throw some light on the use of this "return" keyword in this scenario?

Also, I find that there is a lot of deviation in the way Javascript is written, considering my background in c/c++.. am i alone here..? :)

thanks!

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4 Answers

well if the function returns false, then the event is canceled.

onsubmit="return validateForm();"

is somewhat equivalent to

onsubmit="if(!validateForm()) stop the event"

Of course, that there are other(cleaner) methods of stopping the event dom-propagation :

function stopEvent(event){
    if(event.preventDefault)
         event.preventDefault();
    if(event.stopPropagation)
         event.stopPropagation();
    event.cancelBubble = true;
}

and then use it into an event-handler :

onsubmit = function(e){
    if(!validateForm())
        stopEvent(e);
}
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OK, it seems there appear some misleading answers, so I'll try to provide an explanation. The notation <element onsubmit="handler_body"> is translated to something like:

element.onsubmit = function (event) {
    with (document) {
        with (this) {
            handler_body
        }
    }
};

(We'll ignore the with-related stuff, it's not important here.) Now, consider the validateForm() function returns false. If you use onsubmit="return validateForm()", what subsequently turns obviously into onsubmit="return false", your handler will become

element.onsubmit = function () {
    return false;
};

When the submit event is triggered (it's like the browser internally calls element.onsubmit()), element.onsubmit() returns false and thus the default value is suppressed.

However, if you'd just use onsubmit="validateForm();", the event handler would look like

element.onsubmit = function () {
    false;
};

In this case, false is just a statement. element.onsubmit() doesn't return anything, and returning undefined from the event handler isn't enough to prevent the default behaviour.

@Simeon told that "The return in HTML is not needed.", but he actually also uses return false in his code.

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have you got a jsFiddle showing the differences in behaviour ? That would help me understand ... –  NimChimpsky Oct 3 '11 at 10:24
    
@NimChimpsky return false at jsbin.com/izutum#preview vs. false at jsbin.com/izutum/2#preview . If the default behaviour is prevented, you should stay at the same page and not be redirected to google. –  duri Oct 3 '11 at 10:44
    
ok thx (+1 btw) –  NimChimpsky Oct 3 '11 at 10:58
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The return in HTML is not needed. For the record, to attach the event programmatically is both more beautiful and powerful:

<html>
    <head>
    <script type="text/javascript">

        var myForm = document.getElementById("myForm");

        myForm.onsubmit = function() {
            var x = myForm["email"].value;
            var atpos = x.indexOf("@");
            var dotpos = x.lastIndexOf(".");

            if (atpos < 1 || dotpos < atpos + 2 || dotpos + 2 >= x.length) {
                alert("Not a valid e-mail address");
                return false;
            }
        };
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <form id="myForm" action="demo_form.asp" method="post">
            <label>
                Email:
                <input type="text" name="email">
            </label>
            <input type="submit" value="Submit">
        </form>
    </body>
</html>
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Simeon, I believe this is the answer, though I am yet to test whether this works. AFAIK, this programmatic event handling removes that "extra" return from the code. @duri - Simeon is referring to the "extra" "return" in the "html". the other "return", within the javascript function is still there. To me this seems to be the answer (provided it works), because the onsubmit = "return false" still seems slightly out of the way. Thanks guys! –  arun nair Oct 7 '11 at 18:28
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe everyone has nearly answered the question, but then in different ways. Thanks guys.

I happened to read an excellent article online, which beautifully explains what is actually happening, mostly behind the scenes, using an example that closely resembles the question that I had posted.

Felt this would turn useful for anyone who might face this issue in the future.

Link to the article- http://www.quirksmode.org/js/events_early.html Read the "Prevent Default" section of the page.

--arun nair

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