Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function where I want to transform a list of floats into another one, where for each element I want to have x percent of element i spill over into element i + 1

example:

let p3 = [0.1; 0.2; 0.4; 0.2; 0.1]

then p3_s should be:

[0.05; 0.15; 0.3; 0.3; 0.2]

To do this I took half of each element and added it to the next element.

  • 0.1 became 0.05 because it gave 0.05 to the next, there is no previous element
  • 0.2 became 0.15 because it gave 0.1 to the next and got 0.05 from the first
  • etc
  • and finally 0.1 became 0.2 because it .01 from the previous. There is no next element.

Now I came up with this which works but only for list of size 5:

// create list
let p3 = [0.1; 0.2; 0.4; 0.2; 0.1]

let shiftList orgList shift =    

    // chop list up in tuples of what stays and what moves
    let ms = orgList |> List.map (fun p-> (p * shift, p * (1.0-shift))) 

    // map new list 
    ms |> List.mapi (fun i (move, stay) -> 
        match i with 
        | 0 -> stay
        | 4 -> stay + fst ms.[i-1] + move // note hardcoded 4
        | _ -> stay + fst ms.[i-1])

// get shifted list
shiftList p3 0.5

Now for the questions:

1) How do I make it match on any length list? Now I hardcoded the 4 in the match expression but I'd like to be able to accept any lenght list.

I tried this:

let shiftList orgList shift =    

    // chop list up in tuples of what stays and what moves
    let ms = orgList |> List.map (fun p-> (p * shift, p * (1.0-shift))) 

    // find length 
    let last = orgList.Length - 1

    // map new list 
    ms |> List.mapi (fun i (move, stay) -> 
        match i with 
        | 0     -> stay
        | last  -> stay + fst ms.[i-1] + move 
        | _     -> stay + fst ms.[i-1]) // now this one will never be matched

But this will not treat last as the number 4, instead it becomes a variable for i even though last is already declared above.

So how could I match on a variable, so that I can treat the last elmement differently? Finding the first one is easy because it's at 0.

2) How would you do this? I'm still pretty fresh to F# there are many things I don't know about yet. Guess the general case here is: how do I map a different function to the first and last element of a list, and a general one to the others?

Thanks in advance,

Gert-Jan

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to do:

let shiftList orgList shift =    

    // chop list up in tuples of what stays and what moves
    let ms = orgList |> List.map (fun p-> (p * shift, p * (1.0-shift))) 

    // find length 
    let last = orgList.Length - 1

    // map new list 
    ms |> List.mapi (fun i (move, stay) -> 
        match i with 
        | 0     -> stay
        | last' when last' = last -> stay + fst ms.[i-1] + move 
        | _     -> stay + fst ms.[i-1]) // now this one will never be matched
share|improve this answer
    
i went with 'x when x = last ->', is there any special significance to last' ? or is it just a variable name with a ' in it? –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 10:18
2  
@gjvdkamp there is no significance to the name, although it makes it clear that you are just using it for comparison to the 'real' last variable –  John Palmer Oct 3 '11 at 10:26

Here is a more functional solution

let func (input:float list) =
    let rec middle_end input_ =
        match input_ with
        |h::t::[] -> ((h/2.0)+t)::[]
        |h::t::tt ->((h+t)/2.0)::(middle_end (t::tt))
        | _ -> [] //fix short lists
    let fst = input.Head/2.0
    fst::middle_end(input)

Also, this only requires a single pass through the list, rather than the 3 in Ramon's solution, as well as less temporary storage.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm I like that. I already accepted Ramon's answer but this seems like a more functional approach to this. Thanks. Actually for my code I switched to an array and did away with any intermediate steps so that should be very quick too. There I do use the 'when' syntax to match the last element. –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 10:36
    
Hi thanks again, been playing around with your solution, the fact that you can match deeper an a list than just h::t is quite powerful. Learned a lot today. –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 14:12
    
You can write very complicated things in match expressions, see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd547125.aspx –  John Palmer Oct 3 '11 at 21:15

As an alternative to writing your own recursive function, you can also use built-in functions. The problem can be solved quite easily using Seq.windowed. You still need a special case for the last element though:

let p3 = [0.1; 0.2; 0.4; 0.2; 0.1] 

// Prefix zero before the list, pre-calculate the length
let p3' = (0.0 :: p3)
let l = p3.Length

// Perform the transformation
p3' 
|> Seq.windowed 2
|> Seq.mapi (fun i ar -> 
    (if i = l - 1 then ar.[1] else ar.[1] / 2.0) + ar.[0] / 2.0)
|> List.ofSeq
share|improve this answer
    
Ah.. I did look into Seq.windowed first but got stuck with the first case. Also I didn't know I could use Seq.windowed directly against a list, the Seq.ofList made me leave that path. Thanks, learned some! –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 10:42
    
made it into this: |> Seq.mapi (fun i v -> v.[0] * shift + v.[1] * (1.0 - if i = last then 0.0 else shift)). Actually like this one best but I don;t like taking answers from someone. I'll wait a little longer next time. –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 11:00
1  
@gjvdkamp No problem :-) glad it helped - if you're learning functional programming, then writing the recursive version (by jpalmer) first is good way to learn core functional concepts. Composing solution from functions that are already in the library (like my or Ramon's solution) is probably the second step. –  Tomas Petricek Oct 3 '11 at 11:09
    
I like to not go too overboard with all the functional stuff.. I shy away as soon as it makes me think too hard, I'm into F# mainly for the short syntax for doing this mathy stuff. I promise to give the functional ways some more love in the near future :-) And I do understand jpalmers solution although I wouldn't have come up with that just yet. –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 11:18

Using List.scan:

let lst = [0.1; 0.2; 0.4; 0.2; 0.1]
let len = (lst.Length-1)

lst 
|> List.mapi (fun i e -> (i,e)) 
|> List.scan (fun (c,_) (i,e) -> if i = len then (0.0,e+c) else ((e/2.0),(e/2.0)+c)) (0.0,0.0) |> List.tail 
|> List.map snd
share|improve this answer
    
Took me a second to understand, this is pretty clever too. I was looking for List.unfold where I could push the part that I wanted to shift forward, I guess scan can do just that. Thanks! –  gjvdkamp Oct 3 '11 at 14:48

Just another idea,

let bleh p3 =
    match Seq.fold (fun (give,acc) i -> i*0.5,((i*0.5 + give) :: acc)) (0.0,[]) p3 with
    |(give,h::t) -> give+h :: t |> List.rev
    |(_,[]) -> []
share|improve this answer
    
It works, but I have no idea how..this is pretty terse ;-) I'll pick it apart when I have time. Thanks! –  gjvdkamp Oct 4 '11 at 7:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.