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char **getLines(FILE *pFile)
{
  int nLines = 0;
  size_t memRes = 0;
  char **lines = malloc(memRes);
  char *current = (char*) malloc(20);
  while(fgets(current, 20, pFile) != NULL)
    {
      memRes += sizeof(char*);
      lines = realloc(lines, memRes);
      lines[nLines] = malloc(20);
      strcpy(lines[nLines], current);
      nLines++;
    }
  free(current);
  return lines;
}

void printLines(char **lines)
{
  int lineI = 0;
  while(lines[lineI] != NULL)
    {
      printf("%s", lines[lineI]);
      lineI++;
    }
}

First I get the lines then I print them. The odd thing about it is that my code fails when it has read exactly 13 lines of code and then prints them. I get a segmentation fault after printing the last line. It works with 12 lines and with 14 lines perfectly.

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It doesn't work with 15, 16, 17... lines either. Any clue? –  EinsteinNatrium Oct 3 '11 at 13:00
    
Has your question been answered? If so, accept the correct answer. –  Ned Oct 4 '11 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your printLines function, "while(lines[lineI] != NULL)"

What is happening is that lines[lineI] isn't NULL, it just hasn't been allocated at the end. So because lineI is greater than nLines, it segfaults. You have to pass nLines into the function and use that to check boundries. "while (lineI < nLines)"

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That's right, but it will increase the dependency of functions in the program. Any alternatives? –  EinsteinNatrium Oct 3 '11 at 12:52
    
you could allocate an extra "line" at the end of getLines and make that last line NULL. Then you wouldn't run into the segfault and you wouldn't increase the dependancies –  Ned Oct 3 '11 at 13:55
    
Well, after thinking about it a while I have one last question: "does the array type exist in C as it exists in other high-level languages?" I mean, we have to provide the implementation of the array, right? (For example, setting a NULL terminator.) So, it would be more like playing with a pointer and an index rather than using a data type, right? –  EinsteinNatrium Oct 4 '11 at 17:05
    
An array is not a data type. It is only a list of elements stored consecutively in memory. When you access an array, it literally takes the address of the first element and adds index*sizeof(element) to it. there is no array.length() function or anything like that in c or c++. –  Ned Oct 5 '11 at 13:32
size_t memRes = 0;
char **lines = malloc(memRes);

Lines might be a bit too small.

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You are assuming that the memory past the end of lines will contain a NULL, which it may or may not - it is uninitialized, so it could hold anything. You are getting 'lucky' for some small data sets, and it happens to contain zeros, so it works. For bigger data sets, you are running into an area of memory that has something else in it, and it is failing. If you want lines to be NULL past the set of pointers that hold the data from the fgets() calls, you need to allocate it big enough to hold an extra pointer, and set that space to NULL.

char **getLines(FILE *pFile)
{
  int nLines = 0;
  /* Start lines big enough to hold at least the NULL */
  size_t memRes = sizeof(char *);
  char **lines = malloc(memRes);
  lines[0] = NULL; /* the memory returned by malloc must be initialized */
  char *current = (char*) malloc(20);
  while(fgets(current, 20, pFile) != NULL)
  {
    memRes += sizeof(char*);
    lines = realloc(lines, memRes);
    lines[nLines + 1] = NULL;  /* Prepare the NULL to terminate display loop */
    lines[nLines] = malloc(20);
    strcpy(lines[nLines], current);
    nLines++;
  }
  free(current);
  return lines;
}

void printLines(char **lines)
{
  int lineI = 0;
  while(lines[lineI] != NULL)
  {
    printf("%s", lines[lineI]);
    lineI++;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It causes the same bug that way. –  EinsteinNatrium Oct 3 '11 at 12:56
    
Retracing, I see you are incrementing memres by sizeof(char *), which is correct. However, you are undersizing it by one pointer each time, and you aren't preparing it to contain the NULL that you want to terminate the display loop. Memory allocated by malloc, and memory nor allocated to you (e.g. Past the end of the space allocated to you) is not guaranteed to be initialized to zeros (NULL), it may have the remnants of whatever was in there before. I'll update my answer. –  Russ M. Oct 7 '11 at 12:12

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