Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to perl, and I wonder what this line of code mean?

($q,$dummy, $d,$v) = split;

I search through google, but i found no explanation of using split without argument, does this kind of use related to the "while" block?

And the full code fragment is:

open(T,"$opt_judgments") ||  die "can't open judgment file: $opt_judgments\n";
while (<T>) {
  if ($opt_trec) {
    ($q,$dummy, $d,$v) = split;
  } else {
    ($q,$d,$v) = split;
  }
  $dict{$q ."=".$d} =$v;
  if ($v != 0) {
    $totalRels{$q} ++;
  }
}
share|improve this question
4  
perldoc -f split –  eugene y Oct 3 '11 at 12:38
    
I just try that, cool perl development environment is! –  realjin Oct 3 '11 at 12:55
1  
"I search through google" - That's your mistake. You're better off searching for Perl information at perldoc.perl.org or metacpan.org. –  Dave Cross Oct 3 '11 at 12:56
1  
Searching using Google is quite good if you use a query like site:perldoc.perl.org split. –  ikegami Oct 3 '11 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It splits the current line ($_) on whitespace. Quoting the manual:

If EXPR is omitted, splits the $_ string. If PATTERN is also omitted, splits on whitespace (after skipping any leading whitespace).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, i see! Thanks for your explanation! –  realjin Oct 3 '11 at 12:52

From perldoc:

The general syntax of split is:

split /PATTERN/,EXPR

If EXPR is omitted, it splits the $_ string.

If PATTERN is also omitted, splits on whitespace (after skipping any leading whitespace). Anything matching PATTERN is taken to be a delimiter separating the fields. (Note that the delimiter may be longer than one character.)

Since in your case both PATTERN and EXPR are omitted. A split of $_ on whitespace occurs and the first four pieces of the split are assigned to $q, $dummy, $d and $v respectively.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your exhaustive explanation! Seems that I'm so new to this. –  realjin Oct 3 '11 at 12:54
    
...so split() is the same as split(' ', $_) –  ikegami Oct 3 '11 at 20:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.