Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to define abstract class properties in PHP?

abstract class Foo_Abstract {
    abstract public $tablename;
}

class Foo extends Foo_Abstract {
    //Foo must 'implement' $property
    public $tablename = 'users';   
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 59 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as defining a property.

You can only declare properties because they are containers of data reserved in memory on initialization.

A function on the other hand can be declared (types, name, parameters) without being defined (function body missing) and thus, can be made abstract.

"Abstract" only indicates that something was declared but not defined and therefore before using it, you need to define it or it becomes useless.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1: Nicely explained. –  hakre Oct 3 '11 at 12:38
3  
There is no obvious reason the word 'abstract' could not be used on static properties - but with a slightly different meaning. For example it could indicate that a subclass has to provide a value for the property. –  frodeborli Aug 5 '14 at 9:32

No, there is no way to enforce that with the compiler, you'd have to use run-time checks (say, in the constructor) for the $tablename variable, e.g.:

class Foo_Abstract {
  public final function __construct(/*whatever*/) {
    if(!isset($this->tablename))
      throw new LogicException(get_class($this) . ' must have a $tablename');
  }
}

To enforce this for all derived classes of Foo_Abstract you would have to make Foo_Abstract's constructor final, preventing overriding.

You could declare an abstract getter instead:

abstract class Foo_Abstract {
  abstract public function get_tablename();
}

class Foo extends Foo_Abstract {
  protected $tablename = 'tablename';
  public function get_tablename() {
    return $this->tablename;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice feature, i like how you implement abstract properties. –  Mathieu Dumoulin Oct 3 '11 at 12:47
3  
This would require you to make the constructor final in the abstract base class. –  hakre Oct 3 '11 at 13:06
    
@hakre: I'm not sure I understand you? –  connec Oct 3 '11 at 15:40
2  
Some explanation: If you do the check inside the constructor and if it should be mandatory, you need to ensure that it gets executed on every instance instantiation. Therefore you need to prevent that it gets removed, e.g. by extending the class and replacing the constructor. The final keyword would you allow to do so. –  hakre Oct 3 '11 at 15:48
    
Ahh, that makes sense, thanks. –  connec Oct 3 '11 at 18:11

as stated above, there is no such exact definition. i, however, use this simple workaround to force the child class to define the "abstract" property:

abstract class Father {
  public $name;
  abstract private function setName();    //now every child class must declare this function and thus declare the property
  public function __construct(){
    $this->setName();
  }
}

class Son extends Father{
private function setName(){
  $this->name="son";
}
function __construct(){
  parent::__construct();
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
As far as workarounds go, this is fairly elegant. –  Samyoul Dec 4 '14 at 15:50
    
Elegant, but doesn't solve the issue for static properties. –  Robbert Dec 21 '14 at 20:01
    
I don't think you can have private for abstract methods. –  Zorji Jan 13 at 1:11
    
@Phate01 as i understand it, in the comment itself it states the only "safe" methods to have in a constructor are private and/or final ones, isnt my workaround such a case? im using privates in it –  ulkas Apr 16 at 8:46

As you could have found out by just testing your code:

Fatal error: Properties cannot be declared abstract in ... on line 3

No, there is not. Properties cannot be declared abstract in PHP.

However you can implement a getter/setter function abstract, this might be what you're looking for.

Properties aren't implemented (especially public properties), they just exist (or not):

$foo = new Foo;
$foo->publicProperty = 'Bar';
share|improve this answer

Depending on the context of the property if I want to force declaration of an abstract object property in a child object, I like to use a constant with the static keyword for the property in the abstract object constructor or setter/getter methods.

Other than that the child object overrides the parent object property and methods if redefined. For example if a property is defined as private in the parent and redefined as public in the child, the resulting property is public.

http://www.php.net//manual/en/language.oop5.static.php

abstract class AbstractFoo
{
    public $bar;

    public function __construct()
    {
       $this->bar = static::BAR;
    }
}

class Foo extends AbstractFoo
{
    //const BAR = 'foobar';
}

$foo = new Foo; //Fatal Error: Undefined class constant 'BAR' (uncomment const BAR = 'foobar';)
echo $foo->bar;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.