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I have a generic class I have created as so:

public abstract class MyClass<T>
{
    public T Model
    {
        get;
        protected set;
    }        
}

And at some point in my code I want to do something with anything of MyClass type. Something like:

private void MyMethod(object param)
{
    myClassVar = param as MyClass;
    param.Model....etc
}

Is this possible? Or do I need to make MyClass be a subclass of something (MyClassBase) or implement an interface (IMyClass)?

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Most probably you should consider making your parameter have a specific type to avoid casting. MyMethod might also be a candidate for a generic method, for example. –  Groo Oct 3 '11 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe what you are need is to make MyMethod method generic and add constraint on its type parameter:

interface IMyInterface
{
    void Foobar();
}

class MyClass<T>
{
    public T Model
    {
        get;
        protected set;
    }
}

private void MyMethod<T>(MyClass<T> param) where T : IMyInterface
{
    param.Model.Foobar();
}
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+1 This is exactly what I was working-on when you posted it! –  Prisoner ZERO Oct 3 '11 at 13:31
    
+1 This should do what the OP wants. I'm not sure the interface is necessary unless they want to do something with the Model. –  Joey Oct 3 '11 at 13:44

No.

You need to inherit a non-generic base class or implement a non-generic interface.

Note that you won't be able to use the Model property, since it cannot have a type (unless you constrain it to a base type and implement an untyped property explicitly).

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Yes, you need. If type of generic class is undefined you need to create generic interface or using base-class...

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