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I have a programming problem which I think is being caused by my rustiness in using events and delegates...

I have the code:

public void DoStuff()
        {
            List<IProcess> processorsForService1  = processorsForService1 = ProcessFactory.GetProcessors();

            foreach (IProcess p in processorsForService1)
            {
                if (p.ProcessTimer != null)
                {
                    p.ProcessTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(IProcess_Timer_Elapsed);
                }
            }
        }

And:

  private void IProcess_Timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
            {
                IProcess p = (IProcess)sender;
                p.Step_One();
                p.Step_Two();
            }

But when I get to the event handler im getting null reference exception for p on the first line.

How do I pass an argument to the handler in this instance?

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2  
It doesn't work that way. An object does not know which class it belongs to. The sender is the Timer, not the IProcess –  Oskar Kjellin Oct 3 '11 at 13:29
    
So how can I pass the p to the event handler? I need to call something in each IProcess class every 5000 milliseconds. –  Exitos Oct 3 '11 at 13:33
1  
Why can't each process listen to it's own timer instead? –  Oskar Kjellin Oct 3 '11 at 13:34
    
How do I send an argument to the Handler basically? –  Exitos Oct 3 '11 at 13:35
1  
@OskarKjellin, you should add that comment as an answer. –  RvdK Oct 3 '11 at 13:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like you're using a System.Timers.Timer, if you were to use a System.Threading.Timer then you could pass a state object which, in this case, could be the desired instance of a class, i.e. the timer's 'owner'. In this way, you define your method body as with your previous experience of implementation within an event handler, only now the signature is as follows:

private void MyTimerCallbackMethod(object state)
{

}

Then, upon creating the timer instance, you can do something such as:

var timerCallback = new TimerCallback(MyTimerCallback);
var timer = new Timer(timerCallback, myStateObject, 
    Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);

Then, use timer.Change(whenToStart, interval) to kick off the timer.

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The sender is the timer object, not the object associated with the handling delegate. For a start, events can have multiple handlers.

What you could do is create a delegate which has access to the IProcess using variable capture.

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if you used a lambda instead of a delegate you could refer to the class from the lambda because it would still be in the referencing environment. I think this is called Closure.

public void DoStuff()
{
    List<IProcess> processorsForService1 = ProcessFactory.GetProcessors();
    foreach (IProcess p in processorsForService1)
    {
        if (p.ProcessTimer != null)
        {
            p.ProcessTimer.Elapsed += (s, e) =>
            {
                p.Step_One();
                p.Step_Two();
            };
        }
    }
}

Beware of the following scope related rules though (taken from msdn):

The following rules apply to variable scope in lambda expressions:

  • A variable that is captured will not be garbage-collected until the delegate that references it goes out of scope.

  • Variables introduced within a lambda expression are not visible in the outer method.

  • A lambda expression cannot directly capture a ref or out parameter from an enclosing method.

  • A return statement in a lambda expression does not cause the enclosing method to return.

  • A lambda expression cannot contain a goto statement, break statement, or continue statement whose target is outside the body or in the body of a contained anonymous function.

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Make the event handler a member of IProcess and set up like this:

p.ProcessTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(p.IProcess_Timer_Elapsed);

and if you want to handle the event elsewhere, make the handler forward the event:

class IProcess
{
  public delegate void Timer_Elapsed_Handler (IProcess process, ElapsedEventArgs e);
  public event Timer_Elapsed_Handler Timer_Elapsed;

  public void IProcess_Timer_Elapsed (object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
  {
    if (Timer_Elapsed != null) Timer_Elapsed (this, e);
  }
}
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