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I have a long method, and for reading clarity would like to put some of the code in a separate method. However, that can’t be done because that code uses the variables in the method. So I would like to put that code somewhere else and tell the compiler to insert that code in “this” place when compiling. Is there any way to do that? I’m using visual studio.

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1  
If it's that long, it probably shouldn't be one method anyway - splitting it up would probably be your best choice. –  KevinDTimm Oct 3 '11 at 14:44
4  
Notice that the question you asked and the problem you have are two different things. Your problem is code complexity. It's too long, it's doing too much. The answers you are receving are not answering the actual question you asked, they're answering the actual problem you face. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 3 '11 at 14:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sounds like you're describing the Extract method and you can do this very easily, simply highlight the code you want to move and:

Right click -> Refactor -> Extract method -> Enter method name

Visual studio will deal with the rest for you. Read the docs here.

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Doesn’t work. Can’t access the original method’s local variables. –  ispiro Oct 3 '11 at 14:58
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Have you actually tried it? VS will automatically pass them and return or pass by ref –  m.edmondson Oct 3 '11 at 15:00
    
@ispiro : Refactoring will move or ref your local vars. Did you try anything? –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '11 at 15:00
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Hmm...but doing this will only muddy the water and I can't think of any reason for doing so? –  m.edmondson Oct 3 '11 at 15:26
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@ispiro - What you want to do serves no purpose. –  Ramhound Oct 3 '11 at 15:57

As others have said, the fact that you have the problem in the first place is a symptom of a larger code organization problem. Ideally your methods should be so short, and have so few variables, that you don't need to move big parts of their code somewhere else. The right thing to do is probably to extract portions of the code into their own methods, each of which performs one task and does it well.

As a stopgap measure, you could use code regions to help organize your code:

void BigMethod()
{
    #region Frobbing code
        FrobTheBlob();
        // blah blah blah
        // blah blah blah
    #endregion
    ...

And now in Visual Studio the editor will let you collapse that region down into just a single line that says "Frobbing code".

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a) Region’s is actually how I’ve done it until now. Thanks for the answer (upvoted then). –  ispiro Oct 23 '11 at 20:50
    
b) I need a tie-breaker on a different subject and saw that you work on developing C# itself so if it’s OK with you, here goes: (in a separate comment because it’s too long) –  ispiro Oct 23 '11 at 22:11
    
Will Controls.Clear() leak when the contained controls aren’t referenced anymore in the program? According to Hans Passant here (at the end. In a comment), it will. According to John Saunders, both in the above link and here (in the comment), it won’t. Thanks in advance. –  ispiro Oct 23 '11 at 22:12
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@ispiro: I haven't the faintest idea. My advice is (1) try it and see what happens. Why take anyone's word for it? Try it yourself and then you'll know. And (2) if that doesn't work for some reason, open up a new question. –  Eric Lippert Oct 24 '11 at 5:23

If you have one long method that you can't split because you need to access the same locals, what you really have is another object that you haven't formally made into a class. Refactor your code, extracting the method and shared state into a class of its own, and then start refactoring the method to smaller, more manageable pieces.

class SomeClass
{
    // whatever shared state of the class     
    // whatever methods of the class

    public void MethodThatsDoingTooMuch()
    {
         // long method
         // hard to split the method because of locals
    }
}

to

class SomeClass
{
    // whatever shared state of the class     
    // whatever methods of the class     

    public void MethodThatIsntDoingTooMuch()
    {
        bigSomethingDoer.Do();
    }
}

class BigSomethingDoer
{
    // shared locals are fields instead

    public void Do() 
    {
        // refactor long method into smaller methods
        // shared locals are promoted to class fields
        // this smaller class only does this one thing
        // --> its state does not pollute another class
    }
}
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Thanks. Good idea. –  ispiro Oct 3 '11 at 16:17
    
+1 This is called sprout class by Michael Feathers... –  Jordão Oct 5 '11 at 17:34

well what you ask could be done with macros probably, but if the code is much and not readable you should consider to refactor it and create another method which accepts those variables you have in the main method as parameters.

some Refactoring tools out there have features like extract-method where you select some code and this is moved to another method for you. I guess both ReSharper and DevExpress CodeRush have this feature but I am not 100% sure and I don't have any of them installed to try this right now.

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You probably meant it that way, but I think it wasn't clear from your answer: there aren't macros in C#. –  svick Oct 3 '11 at 19:14

You can use anonymous methods/lambdas to create functions that can access the local variables of the containing method.

But such long methods usually aren't necessary. Try decoupling different parts of the method so they don't need to share common local variables.

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1  
You can access the vars of the containing method but you have to define the lambdas inside it, no gain in the direction the OP wants. –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '11 at 16:54

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