Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a java socket server program which listens to a port continuously. It creates a new text file for the incoming data but I want to create a new text file every 30 mins.

Can someone help me with scheduling this to run every 30 mins?

Thank you.

@paul: i have the following code:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class DateServer extends Thread {

    static public String str;   

   public static void main(String args[]) {

       String pattern = "yyyyMMdd-hhmm"; 
        SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat (pattern); 
        str = format.format(new Date());
        int delay = 0;
        int period = 180000;
        Timer timer = new Timer();

        ServerSocket echoServer = null;
        String line = null;
        DataInputStream is;
        PrintStream os;
        Socket clientSocket = null;

        try {
           echoServer = new ServerSocket(3000);
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
           System.out.println(e);
        }   

        try {
           clientSocket = echoServer.accept();
           is = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
           os = new PrintStream(clientSocket.getOutputStream());

           while (true) {
             line = is.readLine();
             os.println("From server: "+ line); 
             System.out.println(line);

             timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
                 public void run(){
                     try{

        FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter("C://" +str+".txt",true);
        BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream);
        out.write(line);
        out.newLine();
        out.flush(); 
        out.close();
          }catch (Exception e){//Catch exception if any
                System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
                    }

                 }
             }}, delay, period);           
        }   
        catch (IOException e) {
           System.out.println(e);
    }        
    }
}
  1. At "timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() " this line it is giving me the following error: [no suitable method found for scheduleAtFixedRate() method java.util.Timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(java.util.TimerTask,java.util.Date,long) is not applicable (actual and formal argument lists differ in length) method java.util.Timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(java.util.TimerTask,long,long) is not applicable (actual and formal argument lists differ in length)]

  2. at "line = is.readLine();" it is giving me the following error: [cannot assign a value to final variable line].

I am new to java. i am sorry for the terrible indentation. please help me.

share|improve this question
    
@Bart: It sounds like the server is maintaining and internal buffer of data that needs to be dumped every 30 minutes. The server app itself ought to be performing the operation rather than an outside event. –  Paul Sasik Oct 3 '11 at 15:29
    
@Paul, yeah, that might be the case... I thought the "this" in "schedule this to run every 30 mins" was the app itself, but I probably misunderstood. –  Bart Kiers Oct 3 '11 at 15:29
    
Does your program only listen to the port and write the data received into the file? In that case I support the OS script proposal. On the contrary please clarify this so people won't propose that :) –  helios Oct 3 '11 at 15:31
    
With every 30 minutes you mean exactly on the 30th minute (EG 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, etc) or any time as long as there are 30 minutes between one execution and the other? –  Gevorg Oct 3 '11 at 16:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your server simply needs to create a timed interval that fires off every thirty minutes and creates the file. See here for an example, the Java docs and another example.

Here's the code snippet with a few mods for your situation:

int delay = 0;   // delay for - no delay
int period = 1800000;  // repeat every 1.8 mil milliseconds = 30 minutes
Timer timer = new Timer();

timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask() {
        public void run() {
            // Create file here
        }
    }, delay, period);

And fixed up code:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class DateServer extends Thread {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        new Runner().go();
    }
}

class Runner {
    public static  LinkedList<String> data = new LinkedList<String>();

    public void go() {
        ServerSocket echoServer = null;

        MyTimerTask timerTask = new MyTimerTask();
        new Timer().scheduleAtFixedRate(timerTask, 0, 2000);

        try {
            echoServer = new ServerSocket(3000);
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println(e);
        }

        try {
            Socket clientSocket = echoServer.accept();
            DataInputStream is = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
            PrintStream os = new PrintStream(clientSocket.getOutputStream());

            while (true) {
                String line = is.readLine();
                data.add(line);
                os.println("From server: "+ line);
                System.out.println(line);
            }
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }
}

class MyTimerTask extends TimerTask {
    public void run() {
        SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd-hhmm");
        String line = null;
        System.out.print(".");
        try {
            String str = format.format(new Date());
            FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter("C://" +str+".txt",true);
            BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream);
            while (Runner.data.size() > 0) out.write(Runner.data.getLast());
            out.newLine();
            out.flush();
            out.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {//Catch exception if any
            System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage() + e.getStackTrace()[0].toString());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
please see the edited question. thank you for your help. –  Nerd Oct 4 '11 at 16:36
    
ok. There were a lot of problems with your code. Next time you should start simpler and add a feature at a time. One main issue is that you did not have a central place to gather data. My solution uses a linked list of strings that is accessed by two classes. You client code should work against this as is. Happy socketing. –  Paul Sasik Oct 4 '11 at 18:46
    
i really appreciate your help. i tried your code. it is running, but the data received from the client is not written into the file. the file size is not zero, but there is no data written to it. –  Nerd Oct 5 '11 at 14:51
    
@ghbhatt: That sounds like another problem entirely. I would try to isolate the file creation code and post it and the problem as another question. If you do, please link add a comment and the link here. –  Paul Sasik Oct 5 '11 at 15:16
    
Please don't use DataInputStream.readLine(), it has been deprecated for more than tens years. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 20 '13 at 13:26

If on windows, create a batch file that you schedule with the windows scheduler. If in unix/linux, a bash script that you schedule with cron. This would be the easiest and most reliable as the OS would be doing all the work.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not a good solution for an external scheduling program since the data is in the process space of a running program. The server app needs to do this on an internal timer. –  Paul Sasik Oct 3 '11 at 15:39
    
@Paul, I agree, if the this is in the process space of the running program, though I was unable to glean that from the content of the original question. –  Lucas Oct 3 '11 at 15:49

There are many many way to do this. For more flexibility I would look at Quartz-Scheduler

share|improve this answer

It is okay to go for thread scheduling. If you read documentation of threads. It mentions that it doesn't guarantee that thread would be invoked when called, but it will be put into the queue. Still this will be preferable.

Don't go for schedule app in OS level Calling a batch app from OS looses your flexibility to configure the setting through application. It will be worst approach for a java programmer

Best Quartz-Scheduler The best approach will be as mentioned by Gevorg using Quartz-Scheduler

share|improve this answer

You can try this for basic scheduling purposes. For advanced scheduling you can use Quartz library.

ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(NTHREADS);
ScheduledFuture<?> result = scheduler.scheduleWithFixedDelay(
                                 Runnable, 0, 1800, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

0 is the initial delay, 1800 is the subsequent period at which the task should run.

share|improve this answer
/* File Signature.java created by Daniel Hicks on Mon Jun 11 2001. */
import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
public class Signature {
    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {

    ResourceBundle properties = ResourceBundle.getBundle("WebSignature");
    String sigName = properties.getString("sig.file");
    String protoName = properties.getString("proto.file");
    String sayingsList = properties.getString("sayings.list");
    long waitTime = Long.parseLong(properties.getString("delay.time"));
    int lineLength = Integer.parseInt(properties.getString("line.length"));
    long notFoundTime = Long.parseLong(properties.getString("file.not.found.time"));
    int notFoundRetries = Integer.parseInt(properties.getString("file.not.found.retries"));

    Vector proto = new Vector();

    BufferedReader protoReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(protoName));
    String protoLine = protoReader.readLine();
    while (protoLine != null) {
        proto.addElement(protoLine);
        protoLine = protoReader.readLine();
    }
    protoReader.close();

    Vector sayings = new Vector();

    BufferedReader sayingsReader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(sayingsList));
    String sayingsLine = sayingsReader.readLine();
    while (sayingsLine != null) {
        sayings.addElement(sayingsLine);
        sayingsLine = sayingsReader.readLine();
    }
    sayingsReader.close();

    Random rand = new Random();

    int retryCount = notFoundRetries;  // Require first cycle to work

    while (true) {
        int randVal = rand.nextInt();
        randVal = Math.abs(randVal) % sayings.size();
        try {
        PrintWriter sigWriter = new PrintWriter(new FileWriter(sigName));
        for (int i = 0; i < proto.size(); i++) {
            sigWriter.println(proto.elementAt(i));
        }
        putSaying(sigWriter, (String) (sayings.elementAt(randVal)), lineLength);
        sigWriter.close();
        retryCount = 0;
        }
        // Catch I/O error due to AFS being offline.
        catch (java.io.FileNotFoundException ex) {
        retryCount++;
        if (retryCount > notFoundRetries) {
            throw ex;
        }
        // Sleep for a long time (eg, 30 minutes).
        Thread.sleep(notFoundTime);
        }
        Thread.sleep(waitTime);
    }
    }

    private static void putSaying(PrintWriter sigWriter, String saying, int lineLength) throws Exception {
    saying = saying.trim();
    java.text.BreakIterator lineIterator = java.text.BreakIterator.getLineInstance();
    lineIterator.setText(saying);
    int pos = 0;
    int last = lineIterator.last();
    while (pos < last) {
        int newPos = pos + lineLength;
        if (newPos >= last) {
        newPos = last;
        }
        else {
        newPos = lineIterator.preceding(newPos);
        if (newPos <= pos) {
            newPos = lineIterator.following(pos);
        }
        }
        sigWriter.println(saying.substring(pos, newPos));
        pos = newPos;
        while ((pos < saying.length() - 1) && Character.isWhitespace(saying.charAt(pos))) {
        pos++;
        }
    }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I think this is not the ideal solution, but it not deserves a downvote. –  DarkByte Oct 3 '11 at 15:33
2  
For the record: I was one of the down-voters. I did so because what you just posted has little to do with the OP's question, as far as I can see. Perhaps it does, but then I'd like to see some explanation with that code instead of just a dump of horribly indented, sparsely commented Java code, in which case I'd gladly remove the down-vote. –  Bart Kiers Oct 3 '11 at 15:34
1  
Yes, the indentation is awful and this style is prone to mistakes. –  Chris Dennett Oct 3 '11 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.