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I am building a site with a requirement to include plural words but exclude singlular words, as well as include longer phrases but exclude shorter phrases found within it.

For example:

  • a search for "Breads" should return results with 'breads' within it, but not 'bread' or 'read'.

  • a search for "Paperback book" should return results with 'paperback book' within it, but not 'paperback' or 'book'.

The query I have tried is:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE (field LIKE '%breads%') AND (field NOT LIKE '%bread%')

...which clearly returned no results, even though there are records with 'breads' and 'bread' in it.

I understand why this query is failing (I'm telling it to both include and exclude the same strings) but I cannot think of the correct logic to apply to the code to get it working.

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English is an irregular language. You're going to struggle to get a reliable definition of "plural" that you can query with a simple bit of SQL. Also, wildcard searches the way you're using them are very slow. For any reasonably sized database, you're going to have to find an alternative solution. –  Spudley Oct 3 '11 at 15:54
2  
The data in your database is not normalized enough. You need to split each text into it's words and mark per each word if it is singular or not. Then you can search for only singular words within texts. –  hakre Oct 3 '11 at 16:07
    
% is a wild character that matches any thing so be careful when you use in situation like this. –  Vikas Naranje Oct 3 '11 at 16:07
    
... there was a note at the top to say that this was a rewrite - no idea whether a merge is possible? –  CD001 Oct 3 '11 at 16:10
2  
@CD001: Edit your original question to add new information. –  webbiedave Oct 3 '11 at 16:11

3 Answers 3

Searching for %breads% would NEVER return bread or read, as the 's' is a required character for the match. So just eliminate the and clause:

SELECT ... WHERE (field LIKE '%breads%')
SELECT ... WHERE (field LIKE '%paperback book%');
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I believe use of wildcards here isn't useful. Lets say you are using '%read%', now this would also return bread, breads etc, which is why I recommended Full Text Search –  Ghazanfar Mir Oct 4 '11 at 9:53
    
True, but at that point, when you're searching for smaller words, you can use the "and not" extra bits. For longer words which cannot appear in reduced form, this simplified where clause works fine. –  Marc B Oct 4 '11 at 14:01

You should consider using FULL TEXT SEARCH.

This will solve your Bread/read issue.

I believe use of wildcards here isn't useful. Lets say you are using '%read%', now this would also return bread, breads etc, which is why I recommended Full Text Search

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Though that does prevent you from using InnoDB tables. –  CD001 Oct 3 '11 at 15:46

With MySQL you can use REGEXP instead of like which would give you better control over your query...

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field REGEXP '\s+read\s+'

That would at least enforce word boundaries around your query and gives you much better control over your matching - with the downside of a performance hit though.

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