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I couldn't find an exact match on my issue, though many javascript scoping questions do exist. Here is my current code for the question.

var my_var = "blank";
var MyFunc = function() {
    my_var = "one";
    //var my_var = "two";
}
alert(my_var);
MyFunc();
alert(my_var);

When I run this, I am alerted with "blank" and then "one" as expected. However, if I uncomment that one line, so it looks like this.

var my_var = "blank";
var MyFunc = function() {
    my_var = "one";
    var my_var = "two";
}
alert(my_var);
MyFunc();
alert(my_var);

I am alerted with "blank" and then "blank". This is not what I would expect and I find it confusing that adding a line will remove behavior. Can anyone explain what is going on here? I am seeing this behavior in both firefox and safari.

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Yet another good reason why ever using local variables with the same name as global variables is just asking for trouble. –  jfriend00 Oct 3 '11 at 16:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

All var statements are effectively "hoisted" up to the top of their enclosing function (sort of). Thus, the fact that you've got var my_var anywhere in that function means that all mentions of "my_var" refer to the local variable.

(I said "sort of" because the assignment part of the var statement isn't shifted; just the declaration that the identifier should be a local variable.)

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docs? anything that confirms this aside from the example? –  Neal Oct 3 '11 at 15:42
    
To finish your sentence. The hoisting makes my_var a local variable inside the entire function. –  jfriend00 Oct 3 '11 at 15:44
    
The spec makes it pretty clear. Section 12.2. The spec talks about variables being "created", and that's the "hoisting" part. –  Pointy Oct 3 '11 at 15:44
1  
    
Think I will go read some of the spec, thanks Pointy. –  Ty. Oct 3 '11 at 15:55

The reason is because declarations are hoisted within a function's scope in JavaScript. Read more about it here.

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Javascript variables have function scope unlike C, C++, Java, and C# that have block scope (curly brace).

Quick Tip: JavaScript Hoisting Explained

http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/javascript-ajax/quick-tip-javascript-hoisting-explained/

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