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I have been asked to perform a performance test using SQL Server 2008. As part of this, I am comparing the speed of IDENTITY columns as PKs using INTs and BIGINTs. I have a simple routine to create 100,000 rows for each type and time the insert speed. The script looks like this:

SET NOCOUNT ON

CREATE TABLE TestData
(
    PK		INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    Dummy	INT
)

DECLARE @Rows	INT
DECLARE @Start  DATETIME

SET @Rows = 100000
SET @Start = GETDATE()

WHILE @Rows > 0
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO TestData (Dummy) VALUES (@Rows)
    SET @Rows = @Rows - 1
END

SELECT @Start, GETDATE(), DATEDIFF(MS, @Start, GETDATE())

DROP TABLE TestData

For testing BIGINT identities, I use a very slightly modified version:

SET NOCOUNT ON

CREATE TABLE TestData
(
    PK		BIGINT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    Dummy	INT
)

DECLARE @Rows	INT
DECLARE @Start  DATETIME

SET @Rows = 100000
SET @Start = GETDATE()

WHILE @Rows > 0
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO TestData (Dummy) VALUES (@Rows)
    SET @Rows = @Rows - 1
END

SELECT @Start, GETDATE(), DATEDIFF(MS, @Start, GETDATE())

DROP TABLE TestData

To my surprise, the BIGINT version runs appreciably faster than the INT version. The INT version on my test kit takes about 30 seconds and the BIGINT about 25 seconds. Granted the test kit has a 64-bit processor. However, it is running 32-bit Windows and 32-bit SQL Server 2008.

Can anyone else recreate, deny, confirm or contest the results or point out if I have missed something?

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Was any other process run before these two? Which one was run first? –  Daniel A. White Apr 18 '09 at 17:22
    
It doesn't seem to matter. –  BlackWasp Apr 18 '09 at 17:51
    
It's also completely repeatable. I can run the scripts one after another and they vary in time by a couple of hundred milliseconds only but with the BIGINT always around four or five seconds faster. –  BlackWasp Apr 18 '09 at 18:09
    
With SET STATISTICS TIME ON, SET STATISTICS IO ON? –  gbn Apr 18 '09 at 18:44
    
@BlackWasp: Just tried it on Vista x64 / SQL Express 2008 x64 and it made no difference whatsoever (both time @ 46 seconds, reproducibly). OTOH, the Express version performance may be capped, so this may not be a realistic result. –  Tomalak Apr 18 '09 at 19:24

4 Answers 4

To take it a step further, do the same thing with a VARCHAR, such as this:

SET NOCOUNT ON

CREATE TABLE TestData
(
    PK          VARCHAR(8) PRIMARY KEY,
    Dummy       INT
)

DECLARE @Rows   INT
DECLARE @Start  DATETIME

SET @Rows = 100000
SET @Start = GETDATE()

WHILE @Rows > 0
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO TestData (PK, Dummy) VALUES (CONVERT(VARCHAR(8), @Rows), @Rows)
    SET @Rows = @Rows - 1
END

SELECT @Start, GETDATE(), DATEDIFF(MS, @Start, GETDATE())

DROP TABLE TestData

I would expect this to be much slower, since the script is determining the "identity" column, and there are string conversions. Also, I made the VARCHAR(8) to match the number of bytes with a bigint. Yet, in my tests, this runs faster that the INT test from above.

What I take from this is that inserting records into an empty table will be pretty fast no matter what you throw at it. The implications of performance down the road, i.e. other indexes on the table, inserting rows when the table already has a lot of data, etc. is probably a much more important consideration.

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Server1 - On SQL2005 SP3 64-bit... i just tried it (INT then BIGINT) and got 2.9 and 2.6 secs. Then upping the rows to 500000 i got 15.2 and 15.3 secs.

  • More 500K INT/BIGINT runs: 14.0/14.6s; 14.0/15.3s; and 14.7/15.3s. So INT is 5.8% faster than BIGINT.
  • Reversing the order to BIGINT/INT: 15.4/13.8s; 15.3/15.4s; and 12.9/12.7s. INT is 4% faster here.

Server2 - On SQL2000 SP4 EE...

  • INT/BIGINT: 13.7/10.9s; 10.4/13.9s; 9.9/10.2s. INT is 2.9% faster.
  • Then switching to BIGINT/INT: 10.2/13.3s; 10.2/10.1s; and 11.2/10.0s. BIGINT is 5.7% faster.

Basically INT is often but not always faster than BIGINT, but not by anything near the variance i'm seeing across runs.

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Just a guess: did you ever try to test the BIGINT first and the INT afterwards? Database servers like to keep things in memory to optimize similar operations...

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Nope, tried it both ways around, restarting the services in-between. Have you tried it and found opposing results? –  BlackWasp Apr 19 '09 at 9:24
    
No I didn't try until now, it was really just a guess. I can try it at work. –  Stefan Steinegger Apr 19 '09 at 18:55
    
I tried it on SqlServer 2005, it runs in exactly the same time. –  Stefan Steinegger Apr 20 '09 at 8:51
    
Weird - must be my server. –  BlackWasp May 10 '09 at 19:40

I tried that on mine SQL2008. INT takes 14sec. BIGINT takes 18sec.

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I would think some of it is sheer size of the data causing additional page creation. It would be depend on your page sizes too which is configurable, IIRC. You've increased it by 1/3d (8 bytes per row to 12) –  Pecos Bill Nov 16 '12 at 22:15

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