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I'm trying to create a 3D terrain using WebGL. I have a jpg with the texture for the terrain, and another jpg with the height values (-1 to 1).

I've looked at various wrapper libraries (like SpiderGL and Three.js), but I can't find a sutable example, and if I do (like in Three.js) the code is not documented and I can't figure out how to do it.

Can anyone give me a good tutorial or example?

There is an example at Three.js http://mrdoob.github.com/three.js/examples/webgl_geometry_terrain.html which is almost what I want. The problem is that they create the colour of the mountains and the height values randomly. I want to read these values from 2 different image files.

Any help would be appriciated. Thanks

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Just a note that JPEG might not be the best format for a terrain since it's lossy, and the JPEG artifacts will end up as subtle bumps in the terrain that you may not have expected to find. –  izb Dec 3 '12 at 11:56
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2 Answers

Check out this post over on GitHub:

https://github.com/mrdoob/three.js/issues/1003

The example linked there by florianf helped me to be able to do this.

function getHeightData(img) {
    var canvas = document.createElement( 'canvas' );
    canvas.width = 128;
    canvas.height = 128;
    var context = canvas.getContext( '2d' );

    var size = 128 * 128, data = new Float32Array( size );

    context.drawImage(img,0,0);

    for ( var i = 0; i < size; i ++ ) {
        data[i] = 0
    }

    var imgd = context.getImageData(0, 0, 128, 128);
    var pix = imgd.data;

    var j=0;
    for (var i = 0, n = pix.length; i < n; i += (4)) {
        var all = pix[i]+pix[i+1]+pix[i+2];
        data[j++] = all/30;
    }

    return data;
}

Demo: http://oos.moxiecode.com/js_webgl/terrain/index.html

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Two methods that I can think of:

  1. Create your landscape vertices as a flat grid. Use Vertex Texture Lookups to query your heightmap and modulate the height (probably your Y component) of each point. This would probably be the easiest, but I don't think browser support for it is very good right now. (In fact, I can't find any examples)
  2. Load the image, render it to a canvas, and use that to read back the height values. Build a static mesh based on that. This will probably be faster to render, since the shaders are doing less work. It requires more code to build the mesh, however.

For an example of reading image data, you can check out this SO question.

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Option 2 will work better for you in almost any case. Option 1 is only suitable if what you're rendering is only the terrain, because all the elevation data will be known by the shader alone and you will need some other means to position your (presumably) other scene objects. –  Chiguireitor Oct 4 '11 at 10:40
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